Ross, John (1)

Battle:Battle of Worcester in Worcester, Worcestershire, England
Ship/Arrival:John & Sara, May 1652
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 03 Jan 2019 Updated: 19 Mar 2019
Page contributors: Ray Dusek, Teresa Rust


Rosse, John, #1.* NEHGR of Bloody Point (Newington), New Hampshire
Ross, John. #90 on George S. Stewart’s The Dunbar Prisoners List
(He is not listed in Appendix A of Lost Lives, New Voices)


By J S Dow https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5778027

First Generation in the New World

1. JOHN ROSS, was born presumably in Scotland about 1630.

Biographical Notes:
There are several Ross men on the John and Sara Passenger list:
Ross, Alester.* NEHGR
Ross, Dan.* NEHGR
Ross, David.* Rosse in NEHGR
Ross, James, #1.* NEHGR
Ross, James, #2.* NEHGR
Ross, Jonas.* NEHGR
Rosse, John, #1.* NEHGR, of Bloody Point (Newington), Maine.
Rosse, John, #2.* NEHGR
Rosse, John, #3.* NEHGR
1. No record of Marriage or children
2. “All records for John Ross from this source, in the records it say[s] [on] note 341 on Bloodypoint  you will see John Berry was killed here and there are 4 blanks I’m sure they are making reference to John Ross b[e]ing Killed as well.” Ray Dusek

Contributed by Ray Dusek
Contributed by Ray Dusek.
Contributed by Ray Dusek.
03 March 1676/6
03 March 1675/6: Maine: Early Wills and Deeds, 1640-1760. CD-ROM. Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB84/i/7503/44/22202707
Maine: Early Wills and Deeds, 1640-1760.
Still alive on 26 June 1673. William Gowen is also a SPOW. Maine: Early Wills and Deeds, 1640-1760.

Sources and Notes:
*Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire
*Maine: Early Wills and Deeds, 1640-1760. CD-ROM. Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB84/i/7503/44/22202707

Patterson, Edward

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 19 Sep 2018
Updated: 04 Mar 2020
Researchers: Andrew Millard and Teresa Rust.
Editor: Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 254, Edward is categorized as:

Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Patterson, Edward. Residences: Oyster River NH, ?New Haven CT. Appears: 1657. D.?1669. Appears at same time as Scots in Oyster River, but not unambiguously Scottish. [Exiles; DR]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. EDWARD¹ PATTERSON, was born, possibly in Scotland.

Biographical Notes:
There is an “Ed Patterson” in residence at Cochechae in the Dover Town Records for 21 Jul 1657/8. 1 On the same page are listed about a dozen more SPOW men.


SOURCES and NOTES:

New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/i/21175/1151/426898960
  1. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21068/248/45649272 []

Nock, Thomas

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 19 Sep 2018
Updated: 09 Oct 2018
Page contributors: Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust and Kenneth Whittemore.


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 254, Thomas is categorized as:

Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Nock/Knox, Thomas. Residences: Dover NH. Appears: 1657. D.1666. Appears with other Scots at Dover. [Exiles]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. THOMAS NOCK/KNOX, born, possibly in Scotland and died on 29 Oct 1666, from an accident. He married, REBECCA TIBBETS.

Biographical Notes:
On 09 Oct 2018, Dr. Andrew Millard wrote, “The date of the 1652 grant was doubted by Stackpole in his Scotch Exiles typescript (see attached page) where he said “the last figure is very indistinct and doubtful. It may be 1656 or later.” Have you managed to see the original of this grant? If that date is not certain, then all are agreed he had a land grant was in 1657, but there is another indication he was there slightly earlier. Both the Tibbetts and the Knox books says Thomas’s son Thomas jr. made a will on 15 Feb 1676, though Stackpole says 15 Sep 1676. An image of this will ought to be on Ancestryhttps://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=8996, but I don’t have a subscription to US records. Ancestry have transcribed the month as February. Sylvanus, another son, was taxed in 1677 according to the Tibbetts book and Stackpole. They must have been 21 to make a will and be taxed, placing their births in or before 1655 and 1656. Sylvanus was apprenticed in 1670 according to the Tibbetts book, which conventionally would have happened at the age of 14. Although age at apprenticeship did vary, this would fit with a c.1656 birth. If the 1652 date is correct I agree he is unlikely to be a SPOW, but if he first appears in 1655-56, in a place where there were a number of SPOWs, then I’d still consider him to fall in the possible category. The key thing is the date on that first land grant, for which the original or a good image of it needs to be consulted.”

Children of Thomas and Rebecca (Tibbets) Knox/Nock:
2. i. THOMAS² KNOX, b. at Dover, New Hampshire; d. Unmarried.
2. ii. SYLVANUS² KNOX, b. at Dover; m. 1st, ELIZABETH EMERY; m., 2nd, WIDOW ESTHER (PHILBROOK) BEARD.
2. iii. REBECCA² KNOX,
2. iv. ELIZABETH² KNOX, b. at Dover on 21 Nov 1663; d. 12 May 1669, age 5 years.
2. v. HENRY² KNOX, b. at Dover on 08 Feb 1666; m., SARAH ADAMS, dau. of Charles Adams.

Second Generation

2. i. THOMAS² KNOX, (Thomas¹), was born at Dover, New Hampshire and died ?. His will is dated 15 Feb 1676, he gave everything to his mother, siblings and uncle; no wife or children. Unmarried.

2. ii. SYLVANUS² KNOX, (Thomas¹), was born at Dover and died after his will dated 7 Mar 1716, which was proved the following February (1716/17?). He married, first, on 02 Apr 1677, ELIZABETH EMERY, who died 06 Jun 1704. He married, second, Widow, ESTHER (PHILBROOK/PHILBRICK) BEARD.

Children of Sylvanus and Elizabeth (Emery) Knox:
3. i. ELIZABETH³ KNOX, (Sylvanus², Thomas¹), b. 12 Feb 1678.
3. ii. SARAH³ KNOX, (Sylvanus², Thomas¹), b. 4 May 1680.
3. iii. SYLVANUS³ KNOX, (Sylvanus², Thomas¹), m., SARAH DRISCO.
3. iv. THOMAS³ KNOX, (Sylvanus², Thomas¹), m., ABIGAIL (_____).
3. v. JAMES³ KNOX, (Sylvanus², Thomas¹), m., ABIGAIL THOMAS.
3. vi. ZACHARIAH³ KNOX, (Sylvanus², Thomas¹), m., SARAH (_____).

2. iii. REBECCA² KNOX, (Thomas¹), she married, first, WILLIAM WILLEY. She married, second, SAMUEL TIBBETS.

2. iv. ELIZABETH² KNOX, (Thomas¹), b. at Dover on 21 Nov 1663; d. 12 May 1669, age 5 years.

2. v. HENRY² KNOX, (Thomas¹), was born at Dover on 08 Feb 1666. He married, SARAH ADAMS, the daughter of Charles Adams. Sarah married, second, ELEAZER WYER, of Somersworth. Edward Wyer, the SPOW, had a son ELEAZER.

Sources and Notes:

1657, Land Record. Shared by Ray Dusek.

Stackpole in his Scotch Exiles typescript. Shared by Dr. Andrew Millard.

NEHGR 98:61

Hobbs, Henry

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 15 Sep 2018, Updated: 30 Nov 2018
Page contributors: Ray Dusek, Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 253, Henry is categorized as:

Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Hobbs, Henry. Residences: Dover NH. Appears: 1657. D.1698. Appears at Dover at the same time as Scots likely to have been prisoners, and employed in the same mill. The surname, however, is not distinctively Scottish. [Exiles]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Sources and Notes:
From Ray Dusek:
“Here are the sources for Henry Hobbs:
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire
History of Rockingham and Strafford Counties, New Hampshire: with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent…
Maine, Marriage Index, 1670-1921
Pioneers on Maine rivers
U.S., New England Marriages Prior to 1700

Coombs, Allister

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 11 Sep 2018, Updated: 4 Apr 2019
Page contributors: Rosann Beauvais, Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), 1 on page 252, Allister is categorized as:

Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Coombs/Comby, Allister. Residences: York ME, Portsmouth NH. Appears: 1665. D.1707. Probably a Scot, but first appears rather late for a Dunbar prisoner. Perhaps a later migrant. [Exiles; App.B] 2 3

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. ALLISTER/ALESTER¹ COOMBS, was born possibly in Scotland.

Biographical Notes:
No record of marriage or children was found, although based upon notes below, he may have had children. IF a familial relationship can be connected to the Anthony Coombs mentioned below under notes, for whom there has been a DNA project, then this Allister Coombs may not be a SPOW.


Sources and Notes:

Unable to locate references for Allister Coombs residence location in Portsmouth NH or a death of 1707, might have been a date for Alexander Coombs of Portsmouth NH who was reported as deceased in 1707 and his widow, Abigail, was appointed administratrix 15 Aug 1707. See source: http://www.combs-families.org/combs/ms/coombs/19.htm

Reference to Allister Coombs “Comby” was located in York Deeds Book II, Fol 191, dated 19 Jan 1673, as a witness to a deed between Thomas Stephens and Indians “Robine Hoode, Derumquen & Abomhammon, Weroumby & Roben, Sagamors”. 4

Reference to Allister Coombs “Comby” was located in York Deeds Book IX, Fol 254, dated 3 July 1775 as a witness to a deed between Thomas Stephens and Indians “Robine Hoode, Derumquen & Abomhammon, Weroumby Werumby & Roben, Sagamors”. Described as “…adjoyning to Pejepscot river butted & bounded as followeth, to the Land of Thomas Stephens now in possession, East, And to Alester Coombs his Land South. And from the head of Alester Coombs his Marsh westerly to a certain path commonly called the Carrying path or the carrying place, and from the s[ai]d path; upon a straight line to a certain Island commonly called the Stave Island…” 5 There is no documentation of Allister receiving his land through grant or deed but instead was considered a squatter.


The Coombs Families of New England Prior to 1700 investigates an Allister Coombs from New Meadows near what is today Brunswick, Maine. The Coombs of Maine.

It is discussed that the Allister Coombs land in the New Meadows area were not legally acquired and later potential descendants attempted to claim his previously occupied land by applying to the “Pejepscot Company” but their requests were denied. It goes on to state that he occupied the area over a ten year period from 1665 to 1675, possibly being killed by Indian attack or being driven away. There is the suggestion that since Anthony Coombs’ children relocate to that same area in the 1730s they might have been descendant from Allister Coombs.


Discussion on WikiTree states Anthony is a descendant of Pierre Comeau as determined by a DNA test. It is also a theory that Anthony Coombs and Antoine Comeau who was born in Port Royal, Nova Scotia in 1661 are the same person. Based upon this information, it appears that Anthony Coombs should no longer be considered as a potential son of Allister Coombs who we are investigating as a possible Scottish Prisoner of War. See Wikitree page for Anthony Coombs – https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Coombs-55

Also see the related website: Comeau, Sébastien. “Anthony Coombs and His Link to the Comeau Family.” The Comeau Website. November 13, 2013. Accessed August 03, 2018. http://comeaunet.org/en/anthony-coombs-relation-comeau-family/.

Possible son of Allister: New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/i/21174/372/426881880

Excerpt from The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin Meaning and History suggesting the name Coombs might have originated from MacComb or Combe. 6

Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948. The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin Meaning and History, (New York : New York Public Library & Readex Books, 1962), First published in 1946.

For additional help, please go to the:
Descendants and Researchers List and the Facebook Group.
(Our small website team is unable to help with further research.)



  1. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 252. []
  2. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  3. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Appendix B, p. 257-284. []
  4. York County (Me.). Register of Deeds. York Deeds, Book II, 1642-1737. Portland : John T. Hull, 1887, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/yorkdeeds02main/page/n10. []
  5. York County (Me.). Register of Deeds. York Deeds, Book IX, 1642-1737. Portland : John T. Hull, 1894, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/yorkdeeds09main/page/n6. []
  6. Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948. The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin Meaning and History, (New York : New York Public Library & Readex Books, 1962), First published in 1946. []

Bruce, James

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 10 Sep 2018. Updated: 02 Mar 2020
Researchers: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust
Editor: Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 252, James is categorized as:

Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Bruce, James. Residences: Hampton NH. Appears: 1667. [Exiles]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ BRUCE, was born, presumably in Scotland.

Biographical Notes:
Residences: Hampton, New Hampshire. Appears: 1667. [Exiles]

For more information about your ancestor it is HIGHLY recommended that you join the 1,377+ descendants of the Scottish Prisoners of War Society Facebook GROUP where you may be able to get some advice and possibly more information about your Scottish prisoner of war ancestor.


Misc. Notes:

Old Norfolk County Oaths of Allegiance, &c page 203
in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts 28 Nov 1677

25 Apr 1678 in Hampton
((Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21070/203/1426616669))

James BRUCE
Record1677
LocationNorfolk, Massachusetts, United States
Original TextAllegiance Oaths
Original Page203
Original VolumeS1a
Original Line No.475861
Volume NameMA Census Substitutes 1630-1788
Page8456

From:
Massachusetts: Miscellaneous Census Substitutes, 1630-1788, 1840, 1890
(Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. From records supplied by Ancestry.com)
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB509/rd/13684/8456/242326695

Orr, James

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 02 Sep 2018, Updated: 28 Mar 2019
Page contributors: Rosann Beauvais, Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


James Orr, #82 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list 1


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), 2 on page 251, James is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Orr/Oare/Ore/Oer/Eare, James. Residences: Oyster River [Dover, New Hampshire]. Appears: 1658. D.aft.1692. Unmarried. Lived with Henry Brown. One of Valentine Hill’s Seven Scots. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8] 3 4 5 1 6 7

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ ORR/ORE, was born, presumably in Scotland and died at Oyster River in Dover, New Hampshire after 1692. Unmarried.


Scots at Oyster River
Henry Brown (d. bef. 1692)
James Orr (d. aft. 1692)
by
Craig Stinson
July 31, 2016

Henry Brown and James Orr Henry Brown and James Orr appear to have been among the “Seven Scots” who belonged originally to Valentine Hill and worked his sawmill at Oyster River. They eventually located in Wells, Maine, where for several years they owned and operated a sawmill and blacksmith enterprise. Neither ever married; they lived together their entire lives, often at the very edge of civilization, legally binding themselves to one another so that if one died the other was to inherit all their common property. Henry Brown seems to have died before 1692. Because neither married or had children, their stories are seldom retold by later generations. 8

Also see: Henry Brown, #9 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire often listed Henry Brown, James Orr, and “Urine” [Edward Erwin/Irwin – possible Worcester survivor] together. Brown and Orr stated that they learned the sawmill trade from Valentine Hill. They were presumably part of Mr. Valentine Hill’s 7 Scots whose indentures he had acquired. 9 10 7

Timeline:

10 Nov 1658 – Brown and Orr were admitted as inhabitants Oyster River and taxed in 1659. They lived together as unmarried men. 11

1662 – Brown, Orr, and “Errin” [Edward Erwin/Irwin – possible Worcester survivor] bought “a farm at Bradboate Harbour in Pischataq River at the Wadeing place, with 50 acres of upland” for 100 pounds (between Kittery and York, long called “Scotchman’s Neck.”) They also had a grant in 1662 for “eight score acres near “Moharmitts marsh.” 11 7

Abt. 1663- “Layd out and Bounded to Henrey Brown and James Ore fower ackers [four acres] which were given and granted unto Mr. Valentine Hills seven Scotes in the yeir 1652… It bordered on the “freshet” that is, the mill-pond above the dam at Durham Falls, and was on the south side of the river, and on the Newmarket road.” 12

1667-1668 – Brown and Orr may have operated mills at both upper Kittery and Saco falls with Thomas Doughty 11

1667-1669 – Brown and Orr sold out at Oyster River on 8 Aug 1667 to Teige Riall of Oyster River for 30 pounds for four and one half acres with a house and fences. Tiege Riall then sold it to James Smith, a tailor, on 28 Mar 1670. 10 11 13

1675 – Brown and Orr left Doughty, who was now married at Saco, and moved to Wells where at first they got out logs for the Sayward mill, later for their own at Mousam, now Kennebunk village, where it was known as The Scotchmen’s mill. They became residents in the township of Wells, 3 June 1675, buying 200 acres at “Mowsome” from Henry Sayward. “Brown and Orr lived many years in Wells, Me.” 10 11

1679 – The History of Wells and Kennebunk suggests that Henry Sayward entrusted the care of his mills to “Henry Brown and James Carr [Orr?], Scotsmen. These men in 1679, had taken a grant of the land on both sides of the river, bounding on the mill lot. The brook, always termed “the Scotchman’s Brook,” passed through this land.” The book goes on to state that the men, Henry Brown and James Carr [Orr?], “…came over to this country to engage in business of this kind, bringing with them several mechanics as auxiliaries to their work.” The book claims that Brown and Carr [Orr?] established a very successful “blacksmith’s shop on the western side of the river.” The book continues on with speculations on who the men who worked the lumber mills might have not desired a life with women. It seems very speculative and meant to grab one’s imagination. 14

1684- Henry Brown and James Oare [Orr] received a grant on the west side of Mousam river at the “head of tide water”, of four and a half acres. 15

1686- “Brown and Orr brought suit against John Bray for carrying away their grass at brave Boat Harbor.” 12

8 Dec 1692 – James Orr of Wells, logger and sawyer, sold the grant that belonged to him and Henry Brown 10, so presumably Henry Brown had died.


Sources and Notes:
In 2016, Carol Gardner said:
“I’m a researcher for Thomas Doughty. I know that there was a Henry Brown in Maine who lived much of his life with James Orr. They were both Dunbar prisoners and both started as slaves of Valentine Hill at Oyster River. Later, they moved to Wells, Maine where they operated a mill with another Scot, Robert Stewart. Thomas Doughty had a couple of lumber contracts with them, and may have resided with, or near them, during King Philip’s War.”

References:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and
Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, p. 114.
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp. 77.
The History of Wells and Kennebunk, E. E. Bourne, Portland, Me: B. Thurston & Co., 1875, pp. 116-118. E. Bourne offers his imagining as to how their lives together may have been.


For additional help, please go to the:
Descendants and Researchers List and the Facebook Group.
(Our small website team is unable to help with further research.)


  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ [] []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 251. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  5. Stinson, B. Craig. “‘Oyster River Scots.’” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 3 June 2018, scottishprisonersofwar.com/oyster-river-scots-by-b-craig-stinson/. []
  6. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  7. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Ch. 7, 8. [] [] []
  8. Stinson, B. Craig. “‘Oyster River Scots.’” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 3 June 2018, scottishprisonersofwar.com/oyster-river-scots-by-b-craig-stinson/. []
  9. Stackpole, Everett S., and Lucien Thompson. History of the Town of Durham New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation). Vol. One, Narrative, [Durham N.H.] : Published by Vote of the Town, 1913, pg. 60, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historyoftownofd01stac/page/n8. []
  10. Noyes, Sibyl, et al. Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012, pg. 114 [] [] [] []
  11. Stackpole, Everett S., and Lucien Thompson. History of the Town of Durham New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation). Vol. One, Narrative, [Durham N.H.] : Published by Vote of the Town, 1913, pg. 77, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historyoftownofd01stac/page/n8. [] [] [] [] []
  12. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. [] []
  13. Scales, John. Historical Memoranda Concerning Persons & Places in Old Dover, N.H. Vol. 1, Dover, N.H., 1919, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historicalmemora00scal/page/n5. []
  14. Bourne, Edward E. The History of Wells and Kennebunk, B. Thurston & Co. Portland, 1875. pg 116-117, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/116 []
  15. Bourne, Edward E. The History of Wells and Kennebunk, B. Thurston & Co. Portland, 1875. pg 187, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/116 []

Kidd, James

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 24 Aug 2018, Updated: 15 Feb 2019
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


James Kid, Kidd, Skid


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 250, James is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Kidd/Skid, James. Residences: Dover, Exeter NH. Appears: 1656. D.bef.1712. Received land grant at Dover at the same time as other Scots, and is later associated with them. [Exiles; DR; BCS]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices


For more information about your ancestor please contact his descendants and/or researchers. It is also HIGHLY recommended that you join the 600+ descendants of the Scottish Prisoners of War Society Facebook GROUP where you may be able to get some advice and possibly more information about your Scottish prisoner of war ancestor. Our small website team is unable to help with research at this time. ~ Thanks!


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES KIDD, was born possibly in Scotland and died probably in New Hampshire before 1712.

Biographical Notes:
1. A James Kid is in Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire in 1648. 1 This date would be too early for Dunbar.
2. A James Kid is in Norfolk Massachusetts in 1677 in an “Allegiance Oath” in the records.2

Sources and Notes:

Rhode Island: Vital Records, 1636-1850. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014), Originally Published as: Vital record of Rhode Island 1636-1850: First Series: births, marriages and deaths: a family register for the people, by James N. Arnold. Providence, RI: Narragansett Historical Publishing Company.
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB532/i/14497/456/264839311

Massachusetts: Miscellaneous Census Substitutes, 1630-1788, 1840, 1890 (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. From records supplied by Ancestry.com)
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB509/rd/13684/8671/242326910

  1. New Hampshire: Miscellaneous Censuses and Substitutes, 1640-1890 (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. From records supplied by Ancestry.com)
    https://www.americanancestors.org/DB507/rd/13679/10174/242296660 []
  2. Massachusetts: Miscellaneous Census Substitutes, 1630-1788, 1840, 1890 (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. From records supplied by Ancestry.com)
    https://www.americanancestors.org/DB509/rd/13684/8671/242326910 []

Grant, James (1)

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 21 Aug 2018, Updated: 03 Apr 2019
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 249, James (1) is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Grant/Graunt, James (1). Residences: Kittery, ME. Appears: 1662?. D.1683. Left bequests to the children of Peter Grant and James (2) Grant. [Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ GRANT, was born presumably in Scotland and died at Kittery, York County, Maine in 1683.

Denmark, Patrick

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Patrick Denmark“, #17 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list
Name Variations: Denmark/Denmor/Dunmarke, Patryarke
Resided: Dover, New Hampshire and Saco, Maine
Associations: Henery Brown and Thomas Doughty


First Generation in the New World

1. PATRICK¹ DENMARK, “Patrick the Scot“, was born in Scotland, about 1636 and died in Maine? after 1685. He married, at Saco, Maine, by 1663, HANNAH/ANNA (_____). 1

Biographical Notes:
1. Contributed by Dr. Andrew Millard in July 2018:
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 249, Patrick is categorized as: Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Denmark/Denmor, Patrick. Residences: Dover NH, Saco ME. Appears: 1662. B.c.1636. D.aft.1685. Closely associated with the Scots at Oyster River. [Exiles; DR; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8] For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.
2. Taxed in Dover, New Hampshire in 1662. 2
3. Moved to Saco, Maine after 1665 where more children were born. 2
4. Gave oath for land transaction in Maine on 21 Oct 1667, “Patrick Dumark” 3

Children of Patrick and Hannah (_____) Denmark: 2
2. PATRICK² DENMARK, born at Dover, NH on 08 Apr 1664.
2. JAMES² DEMNARK, born at Dover on 13 Mar 1665.
2. SON² DUNMARKE, born at Saco and Biddeford, Maine on 14 Oct 1667.4

Second and Third Generations

2. PATRICK² DENMARK, born at Dover, NH on 08 Apr 1664.

2. JAMES² DENMARK, was born at Dover [or Durham], NH on 13 Mar 1665 [or 13 May 1666]. He married at Wells, Maine on 01 April 1694, ELIZABETH [BARRETT] LITTLEFIELD, wife of Nathan. 2, 5

Biographical Notes:
A James Denmark has property in Kennebunk/Wells, Maine in 1699 nearby other Scots.6

2. SON² DUNMARKE, born at Saco and Biddeford, Maine on 14 Oct 1667.4

Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.)
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21135/125/426743720

Published: 21 August 2018
Updated: 11 Apr 2020
Researchers: Ray Dusek, Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust
Editor: Teresa Rust


For more information please contact the descendants/researchers of Patrick Denmark. Thank you! 🙂


Sources:
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire.

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Bridget Denmark inGenealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.

Misc. Notes: (Until the below information can be verified, please use with caution.)
Submitted by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018:
Patrick Denmark, 1630–1698
Birth 1630 • ,,,Scotland
Death 1698 • Saco, York, Maine
Spouse: Hannah 1646-?
Children
Patrick Denmark 1664
James Denmark 1666-1698
John Denmark 1667-1669
Bridget Denmark 1669
Elizabeth Denmark 1671

James Denmark son of Patrick Denmark, 1666–?
Birth 13 MAY 1666 • Durham, Strafford, New Hampshire
Death ? • Boston Massachusetts
Spouse: Elizabeth Barrett 1664-1721
Children:
Lydia Denmark 1695
Elizabeth Barrett Denmark 1697
Mary Denmark 1698

Elizabeth Denmark daughter of Patrick Denmark 1671–
Birth 1671 • Eliot,York,Maine,British American Colony
Death Wells, York, Maine,
Spouse 1:
James Burnham 1687-1757
Children:
JAMES Burnham 1710-1787
Spouse 2:
Robert Sinclair 1680-1718 (see note at bottom of page )**
Children:
Elizabeth Sinclair 1713
John SINCLAIR 1714-1770
Spouse 3:
Peter Rich 1687-1755
Children:
Mary Rich 1718
Elizabeth was charged in court 1st was because of James Burnham 1710-1787 born out of wedlock
Maine Court Records, 1696-1854, Denmark, Elizabeth, Plaintiff/Defendant, York Court of Sessions
Date: January 1711
Cause: FORNICATION
Volume and Page 6-355-642-YORK
2nd was not going to church
Maine Court Records, 1696-1854
Denmark, Elizabeth, Plaintiff/Defendant, DEF, York Court of Sessions, date January 1697
NONATTENDANCE CHURCH
Volume and Page: 2-98-120-YORK
Robert Sinclair maybe related to one of the Scottish SPOW,I have not looked into it as of yet. Bridget Denmark daughter to Patrick Denmark if you see the attachment on her seem like she had her share of problems.

  1. DENMARK, Patrick & Hannah?/Anna ____; by 1663; Saco, ME/Dover, NH {Dover NH Mar. 48; Harmon Anc. 50; Sv. 2:38; GDMNH 193; Reg. 71:125}” New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21174/443/426883442 []
  2. Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018. [] [] [] []
  3. Maine: Early Wills and Deeds, 1640-1760. CD-ROM. Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB84/i/7514/86/22206947 []
  4. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21135/125/426743720 [] []
  5. New England Marriages to 1700. Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/i/21174/443/426883442 []
  6. https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/226/mode/2up/search/Stewart []