MacDonald, Alexander

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 18 August 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


M’Donald, Alexander , #75 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (Jul 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 255, Alexander is categorized as:

Doubtful [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

MacDonald/MackDonel/Mackdonnell/Mcdannel, Alexander /Sander. Residences: Dover, Oyster River NH. Appears: 1661. D.1663. Kinsman to John Roy. Probably the Sander Mackdonell of the John & Sara list. [Exiles; DR; SPOWS]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


McNair, Alexander

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 23 Aug 2016, Updated: 01 Sep 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


Alexander M’Nair, #77 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 250, Alexander is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

McNair/Mackanere/MacNair/Mackaneer/Macaneere/Machanare/Mackinire/Mackinime, Alexander. Residences: Scotland York ME. Appears: 1666. D.1670. He first appears quite late but has extensive interactions with other Scots in York. His widow married Micum McIntire [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Descendants & Researchers

Scottish Surname:

The surnames of Scotland, their origin meaning and history ... Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948.
The surnames of Scotland, their origin meaning and history … Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948.

First Generation in the New World

1. ALEXANDER¹ MCNAIR, was born presumably in Scotland and died in New Hampshire about 1670. He married, DOROTHY PEARCE, daughter of fisherman, John Pearce of York. He had no children.

Biographical Notes:
Alexander was probably not one of Valentine Hill’s Scots, but he was one of the Dunbar prisoners. He married Dorothy, the younger daughter of fisherman John Pearce of York. When we see him as a free man, probably in his mid-30’s, he is suffering from lameness and weakness; he died about 1670, leaving no children. His widow Dorothy married fellow Scot Micum McIntire.

John Pearce’s younger daughter Dorothy Pearce first married Scot Alexander Mackaneer (unknown date).
[Note: Stinson suspects he is the “Alexander M’Nair” who is #77 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list.] [see also GDMNH 451]
In 1666 he and his wife were excused for their 5-week absence from church due to his lameness and weakness.
Mackaneer died about 1670; he had no children [GDMNH 451]
Before 4 Sep 1671 Dorothy Pearce Mackaneer married Micum McIntire (#61 on the Dunbar Prisoners list) [GDMNH 451, 553, 472]

SOURCES AND NOTES:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, pp. 129, 451, 472, 553.
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, p. 77.
History of York, Maine, vol. 1, Charles Edward Banks, Boston: Society for the Preservation of Historical Landmarks in York County, 1931-1935, pp. 267-270, 282
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thurtle-walker&id=I317
B. Craig Stinson
July 23, 2016

Middleton, James

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 23 Aug 2016
Updated: 04 Mar 2020
Researchers: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson
Editor: Teresa Rust


James Middleton, #55 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list

Name variations: Middleton, Medellton


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 251, James is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Middleton, James. Residences: Oyster River, Great Island NH, Kennebec ME. Appears: 1658. D.aft.1683. Probably one of Valentine Hill’s seven Scots. [Exiles; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES PATTERSON, was born presumably in Scotland and died after 1676.

Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.)
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21071/257/1427098887

Descendants and Researchers

________________________________________________________
Scots at Oyster River
James Middleton by B. Craig Stinson
15 August 2016

James Middleton was a single man who probably worked originally for Valentine Hill. In his early life he was in court for frequenting taverns and also for quarreling and fighting. The fight that got him into court was with two Englishmen and with Scot William Gowen. Middleton may have worked in the home of the local medical doctor, David Ludecas Edling. When Dr. Ludecas died in 1660 followed by Mrs. Edling in 1664, James Middleton was assigned to administer their estate. Later he sold land to the same William Gowen he had fought with in earlier years.

#55 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

14 Feb 1658 – admitted as inhabitant of Dover [GDMNH 478]
3 June 1659 – convicted of frequenting taverns and for quarrelling and fighting.
Fined £20, Valentine Hill was surety on his bond for good behavior. That same time, Philip Chesley, Thomas Footman, and William Smith (Gowan) were convicted of quarrelling with Middleton and were fined; George Vezie was convicted of being more than half an hour in the tavern.

Middleton, James 2

New Hampshire Court Records, 1659
26 October 1660 – on jury of inquest in the death of Thomas Canyda who was killed when a tree fell on him.
May have worked in home of Dr. David Ludecas Edling at Dover
1660 – administered estate of Ludecas Edling
1664 – administered estate of Mrs. Edling [HTDNH 82-83] [GDMNH 447]
16 Sep 1676 – was a resident of Great Island
1676 – sold land at Small Point on the Kennebec to William Gowen. [GDMNH 280 and HTDNH 83]
No known family [GDMNH 478]

Sources:
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp. 82-83.

GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, pp. 280, 447, 478.

New Hampshire Court Records 1640-1692, vol. 40, Ed. Otis G. Hammond, The State of New Hampshire, 1943, pp. 139, 199, 469

B. Craig Stinson
August 15, 2016
______________________________________________________________

Murray, James

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 17 Aug 2016, Updated: 02 Sep 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson


James Murray, #51 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 251, James is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Murray/Morrey, James. Residences: Oyster River NH. Appears: 1659. Closely associated with the Scots at Oyster River. [Exiles; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Researcher:
B. Craig Stinson – – Researcher

First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ MURRAY, was born, presumably in Scotland, and died at Dover, New Hampshire, on 11 Nov 1659.

Biographical Notes:
It is believed he died childless


Scots at Oyster River
James Murray (d. 1659)
By B. Craig Stinson, 7 August 2016

James Murray was accidentally killed when a large tree limb fell on his head, just a year after his indenture ended. The jury of inquest seems to have examined the head wound of the deceased Murray in making their ruling, which was apparently how such inquests were conducted at the time. This jury included fellow Scots William Gowen (here listed as William Smith) and Niven Agnew, as well as our (English) John Hill of Dover.

James Murray, aka James Morrey, James Morray
#51 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list as “James Murray”

10 Feb 1658-9 – admitted as an inhabitant of Dover [GDMNH 502]

11 Nov 1659 – “Acedently killd By falling of A tree”

image002

Sources:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, p. 502.

HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, p. 83.

New Hampshire Court Records 1640-1692, ed. Otis G. Hammond, The State of New Hampshire, 1943, p. 465 [Court Papers, vol. I, p. 41]

Craig Stinson
August 7, 2016


Grant, James (3) “the Drummer”

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 22 June 2016, Updated: 14 Sep 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 253, James (3) ‘the Drummer’ is categorized as:

Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Grant/Graunt, James (3) ‘the Drummer’. Residences: Dover NH, York ME. Appears: 1657. D.1693. Also recorded as ‘welsh James Grant’ [Exiles; DR; BCS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ GRANT (3), “the Drummer”, “welsh James Grant”, “of York,” died in 1693. He married, HANNAH (_____).

Children of James and Hannah (_____) Grant:
2. JAMES GRANT, m., PATIENCE AUSTIN, daughter of, MATTHEW AUSTIN.

Second Generation

2. JAMES GRANT, m., PATIENCE AUSTIN, daughter of, MATTHEW AUSTIN.

Children of James and Patience (Austin) Grant: FIVE SONS
3. JOSHUA GRANT, b. 9 Oct 1712, m., MERCY (_____). SIX CHILDREN

Stackpole, Everett S.. The History and Genealogy of the Stackpole Family, (Lewiston, Maine: Journal Printshop and Bindery, 1920): Page 151:

https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy00stac#page/150/mode/2up/search/Grant
James may have been a Dunbar POW instead of a Worcester POW according to Lost Lives, New Voices https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy00stac#page/150/mode/2up/search/Grant

Brown, Henry

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 24 May 2016
Updated: 13 Apr 2020
Researchers: Rosann Beauvais, Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson
Editors: Teresa Rust and Rosann Beauvais


Henry Brown, #9 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list1

First Generation in the New World

1. HENRY¹ BROWN, was born presumably in Scotland; d. ca. 1692 perhaps in Wells, Maine. Unmarried.

Biographical Notes:
1. Contributed by Dr. Andrew Millard in July 2018:
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018),2 on page 248, Henry is categorized as: Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Brown/?Brounell, Henry. Residences: Oyster River NH, Wells ME. Appears: 1658. D.1677×1692. Unmarried. Lived with James Orr. One of Valentine Hill’s Seven Scots. It is just possible that he is the Henry Brounell on the John and Sara. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]3 4 5 1 6 7

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.
2. In 2016, Carol Gardner said:
“I’m a researcher for Thomas Doughty. I know that there was a Henry Brown in Maine who lived much of his life with James Orr. They were both Dunbar prisoners and both started as slaves of Valentine Hill at Oyster River. Later, they moved to Wells, Maine where they operated a mill with another Scot, Robert Stewart. Thomas Doughty had a couple of lumber contracts with them, and may have resided with, or near them, during King Philip’s War.”


Scots at Oyster River
Henry Brown (d. bef. 1692)
James Orr (d. aft. 1692)
by
Craig Stinson
July 31, 2016

Henry Brown and James Orr Henry Brown and James Orr appear to have been among the “Seven Scots” who belonged originally to Valentine Hill and worked his sawmill at Oyster River. They eventually located in Wells, Maine, where for several years they owned and operated a sawmill and blacksmith enterprise. Neither ever married; they lived together their entire lives, often at the very edge of civilization, legally binding themselves to one another so that if one died the other was to inherit all their common property. Henry Brown seems to have died before 1692. Because neither married or had children, their stories are seldom retold by later generations.5

Also see: James Orr aka Ore, Oar, Carr, #82 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire often listed Henry Brown, James Orr, and “Urine” [Edward Erwin/Irwin – possible Worcester survivor] together. Brown and Orr stated that they learned the sawmill trade from Valentine Hill. They were presumably part of Mr. Valentine Hill’s 7 Scots whose indentures he had acquired.8 9 7

Timeline:

10 Nov 1658 – Brown and Orr were admitted as inhabitants Oyster River and taxed in 1659. They lived together as unmarried men. 10

1662 – Brown, Orr, and “Errin” [Edward Erwin/Irwin – possible Worcester survivor] bought “a farm at Bradboate Harbour in Pischataq River at the Wadeing place, with 50 acres of upland” for 100 pounds (between Kittery and York, long called “Scotchman’s Neck.”) They also had a grant in 1662 for “eight score acres near “Moharmitts marsh.” 10 7

Abt. 1663- “Layd out and Bounded to Henrey Brown and James Ore fower ackers [four acres] which were given and granted unto Mr. Valentine Hills seven Scotes in the yeir 1652… It bordered on the “freshet” that is, the mill-pond above the dam at Durham Falls, and was on the south side of the river, and on the Newmarket road.” 11

1667-1668 – Brown and Orr may have operated mills at both upper Kittery and Saco falls with Thomas Doughty 10

1667-1669 – Brown and Orr sold out at Oyster River on 8 Aug 1667 to Teige Riall of Oyster River for 30 pounds for four and one half acres with a house and fences. Tiege Riall then sold it to James Smith, a tailor, on 28 Mar 1670.9 10 12

1675 – Brown and Orr left Doughty, who was now married at Saco, and moved to Wells where at first they got out logs for the Sayward mill, later for their own at Mousam, now Kennebunk village, where it was known as The Scotchmen’s mill. They became residents in the township of Wells, 3 June 1675, buying 200 acres at “Mowsome” from Henry Sayward. “Brown and Orr lived many years in Wells, Me.” 9 10

1679 – The History of Wells and Kennebunk suggests that Henry Sayward entrusted the care of his mills to “Henry Brown and James Carr [Orr?], Scotsmen. These men in 1679, had taken a grant of the land on both sides of the river, bounding on the mill lot. The brook, always termed “the Scotchman’s Brook,” passed through this land.” The book goes on to state that the men, Henry Brown and James Carr [Orr?], “…came over to this country to engage in business of this kind, bringing with them several mechanics as auxiliaries to their work.” The book claims that Brown and Carr [Orr?] established a very successful “blacksmith’s shop on the western side of the river.” The book continues on with speculations on who the men who worked the lumber mills might have not desired a life with women. It seems very speculative and meant to grab one’s imagination. 13

1684- Henry Brown and James Oare [Orr] received a grant on the west side of Mousam river at the “head of tide water”, of four and a half acres. 14

1686- “Brown and Orr brought suit against John Bray for carrying away their grass at brave Boat Harbor.” 11

8 Dec 1692 – James Orr of Wells, logger and sawyer, sold the grant that belonged to him and Henry Brown 9 , so presumably Henry Brown had died.

— By B. Craig Stinson


Sources and Notes:
References:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and
Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, p. 114.
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp. 77.
The History of Wells and Kennebunk, E. E. Bourne, Portland, Me: B. Thurston & Co., 1875, pp. 116-118. E. Bourne offers his imagining as to how their lives together may have been.


For additional help, please go to the Facebook Group.

  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ [] []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 248. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  5. Stinson, B. Craig. “‘Oyster River Scots.’” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 3 June 2018, scottishprisonersofwar.com/oyster-river-scots-by-b-craig-stinson/. [] []
  6. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  7. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Ch. 7, 8. [] [] []
  8. Stackpole, Everett S., and Lucien Thompson. History of the Town of Durham New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation). Vol. One, Narrative, [Durham N.H.] : Published by Vote of the Town, 1913, pg. 60, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historyoftownofd01stac/page/n8. []
  9. Noyes, Sibyl, et al. Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012, pg. 114 [] [] [] []
  10. Stackpole, Everett S., and Lucien Thompson. History of the Town of Durham New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation). Vol. One, Narrative, [Durham N.H.] : Published by Vote of the Town, 1913, pg. 77, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historyoftownofd01stac/page/n8. [] [] [] [] []
  11. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. [] []
  12. Scales, John. Historical Memoranda Concerning Persons & Places in Old Dover, N.H. Vol. 1, Dover, N.H., 1919, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historicalmemora00scal/page/n5. []
  13. Bourne, Edward E. The History of Wells and Kennebunk, B. Thurston & Co. Portland, 1875. pg 116-117, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/116 []
  14. Bourne, Edward E. The History of Wells and Kennebunk, B. Thurston & Co. Portland, 1875. pg 187, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/116 []

Daniel, Davey

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published on: 3 March 2016, Updated: 03 Sep 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018).

On page 252, Davey is categorized as:
Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Daniel, Davey. Residences: Oyster River NH. Appears: 1661. D.1685. The only evidence he was a Scot seems to be his involvement with the Scots at Oyster River. [Exiles; DR; SPOWS]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Name Variations:
Daniel, Daniels

SPOW Y-DNA Study:
4-A. Daniels. Davy Daniel, m. 1656, Dover NH
229953 Daniels Davy Daniel, Appeared 1655 d. 1685 Durham, N.H.


First Generation in the New World

1. DAVEY¹ DANIEL, was born, presumably in Scotland and died in Durham, New Hampshire in 1685.

Biographical Notes:
Davy Daniels first appears in 1655 and marries in Dover, New Hampshire in 1656. He died in Durham, New Hampshire in 1685. ““Davey Daniel” is suspected of being a Scot. He is first mentioned in the settlement of a Scotchman’s estate.” ~ History of Town of Durham.

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-9-52-08-am-2
Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn (1850-1927) and Lucien Thompson. History of the town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) with Genealogical Notes, (Durham, New Hampshire: Town of Durham, 1913).

SOURCES AND NOTES:
Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn (1850-1927) and Lucien Thompson. History of the town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) with Genealogical Notes, (Durham, New Hampshire: Town of Durham, 1913).

Dowty, Thomas (Doughty)

Battle:3 Sep 1650, Battle of Dunbar, at Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity; Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:“Thomas Dowty” #19 on ‘George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar List
Name Variations:Doughty, Doutie, Dowty
Residences:Oyster River, New Hampshire; Salem and Malden, Massachusetts; and Kittery and Saco, Maine
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 17 Feb 2016, Updated: 15 Oct 2018
Page contributors: Karen Doughty, Robert Doughty, Ray Dusek, Carol Gardner, Diane McCabe, Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson, Virginia (Doughty) Vaught


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 249, Thomas is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Dowty/Doughty, Thomas. Residences: Oyster River NH, Salem, Malden MA, Kittery, Saco ME. Appears: 1658. B.c.1630. D.1705. One of Valentine Hill’s seven Scots. Failed in an attempt to revive the Great Works Mill at Kittery in 1665. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. THOMAS¹ DOUGHTY, was born, presumably in Scotland about 1630 and died at Salem in 1705. Probate recorded on 12 March 1706. He married at Saco, York County, Maine on 24 Jan 1669, ELIZABETH BULLY/BULLIE, she was born at Saco in 1653 and died at Windham, CT in 1715.1

Biographical Notes:
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner’s Journey to the New World, by Carol Gardner, Hardcover, Available for pre-order at Amazon. Released October 25, 2018.
“1658 – received as an inhabitant of Dover [New Hampshire] [HTDNH 78]
Abt 1660 – lived with Valentine Hill, cut a road for Hill to his meadow at Wheelwright’s Pond; Hill paid Doughty £10 for cutting the road [HTDNH 78]
1661-1665 – taxed at Oyster River [New Hampshire]
1663 – he and John Wingate were partners in a logging contract
5 Jul 1664 – Thomas Doughty was bondsman promising that Peter Grant would appear in court to answer on the charge of bigamy.
Doughty gained high repute as a lumberman
Succeeded Roger Plaisted at the Great Works mill [also OKAHF 129]
Must have had a mill of his own at Doughty’s Falls, Berwick
1667 – removed to the mill at upper Kittery and the Saco Falls mills with Henry Brown and James Orr [GDMNH 114]
24 Jan 1669-70 – married Elizabeth Bully (aka Bulie) at Saco
before Philip’s War [1675] had removed to Wells, where he remained throughout that conflict
1686 – was a tenant of Mrs. Bridget Phillip’s mill at Saco
His petition to Andros mentioned a gristmill built by himself
1688 – Saco town treasurer” ~ Craig Stinson
He left children, viz., James who married, 10 April 1707, Mary Robinson in Hampton, N.H., and settled in Cape Elizabeth, Me.; Joseph of Salem; Elizabeth who married Thomas Thomes and went to Falmouth, Me.; Benjamin; Margaret, who married Samuel Wilson of Malden, Mass.; Abigail who married at Lynn, Mass., 28 October 1717, Robert Edmonds; and Patience who married Benjamin Follett of Salem, Mass. The descendants of Thomas Doughty are many in Maine and Massachusetts.” ~ Craig Stinson (See Craig’s research below.)
From Craig Stinson: “The Genealogical Dictionary of of Maine and New Hampshire, p 200, lists 7 children of Thomas Doughty (aka Dowty). Four are girls, so the surnames of those children are many… Thomas, Chamberlain, Wilson, Follet, Edmunds, Potter.
The three Doughty boys are:
Joseph (married Elizabeth Nurse in Salem in 1707, administered his father’s estate, died about 1751, 3 children)
James (born about 1680, married Mary Robinson) – this is the person to which Carol Gardner is referring.
Benjamin (settled in Windham, CT)
Carol Gardner wrote: “If the James Douty on your tree is the one who resided in Portland (then called “Falmouth”) Maine after about 1715, and married Mary Robinson (from Hampton or “Quamscuk,” NH), he was the third son of Thomas Doughty. I can’t speak to later generations of his family, except to say that his son David settled on Chebeague Island, Maine.” ~ Carol Gardner

Children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Bully) Doughty: (Seven children)
2. i. JOSEPH DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), died about 1751; m. at Salem on 4 Dec 1707, ELIZABETH NURSE.
2. ii. ELIZABETH DOUGHTY,(Thomas¹), m. THOMAS THOMES/TOMS/TOMAS (PR)
2. iii. BENJAMIN DOUGHTY,(Thomas¹), settled in Windham, Connecticut.
2. iv. JAMES DOUGHTY,(Thomas¹), born about 1680; m. at Hampton, NH on 10 Apr 1707, MARY ROBINSON. (In Probate Record below.) She was b. at Exeter, NH in 1685; d. 1772.
2. v. MARGARET DOUGHTY,(Thomas¹), m., SAMUEL WILSON, of Malden.
2. vi. ABIGAIL DOUGHTY,(Thomas¹), m. at Lynn, Massachusetts on 28 Oct 1717, ROBERT EDMONDS.
2. vii. PATIENCE DOUGHTY,(Thomas¹), m. at Salem on 13 Mar 1706/7, BENJAMIN FOLLETT/FOLLIT.

Second Generation

2. i. JOSEPH² DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), probably born at Saco and died about 1751. He married at Salem on 4 Dec 1707, ELIZABETH NURSE.

Biographical Notes:
Administered his father’s estate.

Salem, Massachusetts, Marriages Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001-2016).
Salem, Massachusetts, Marriages Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001-2016).

Children of Joseph and Elizabeth (Nurse) Doughty:
3. i. MARY³ DOUGHTY,(Joseph², Thomas¹), b. at Salem in 1708; m. at Salem on 6 Jun 1728, WILLIAM TWISS.
3. ii. ELIZABETH³ DOUGHTY,(Joseph², Thomas¹), b. at Salem in 1710; d. 1783; m. at Salem on 17 Sep 1729, JONATHAN SOUTHWICK.
3. iii. DESIRE³ DOUGHTY,(Joseph², Thomas¹), born in 1717; d. in 1759; m. at Mansfield in 1737/8.
3. iv. JOSEPH³ DOUGHTY,(Joseph², Thomas¹), baptized 17 Dec 1727; d. 14 Jul 1791; m. at Salem on 28 jul 1747, ELIZABETH TWISS.

2. ii. ELIZABETH DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), m. THOMAS THOMES/TOMS/TOMAS (PR)

2. iii. BENJAMIN DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), moved to Windham, Connecticut.

2. iv. JAMES DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), was born possibly at Saco, York, Maine about 1680 and died in 1760. He married at Hampton, New Hampshire on 10 Apr 1707, MARY ROBINSON. (In Probate Record below.)

Sanborn, George Freeman, Jr., and Sanborn, Melinde Lutz. Vital records of Hampton, New Hampshire : to the end of the year 1900. Boston, Mass: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1992. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2016)
Sanborn, George Freeman, Jr., and Sanborn, Melinde Lutz. Vital records of Hampton, New Hampshire : to the end of the year 1900. Boston, Mass: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1992. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2016)

Children of James and Mary (Robinson) Doughty/Doutee:
3. DAVID³ DOUGHTY, (James², Thomas¹), b. in 1720 and died 1800. He settled on Chebeague Island, Maine; m. at Falmouth, on 14 May 1742, SARAH GETCHELL, she was b. 1723, d. at Brunswick, ME in 1800.

4. STEPHEN DOUGHTY, (David³, James², Thomas¹), b. at Falmouth in 1750 and died in at Topsham, ME in Jul 1834; m. at Topsham in 1768, HANNAH WALLACE, she was at Cape Elizabeth, ME, in 1742; d. at Topsham ME, in 1832.

2. v. MARGARET² DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), m., SAMUEL WILSON, of Malden.

2. vi. ABIGAIL² DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), was born at Saco in 1684. She died at Salem in Jul 1761. She married at Lynn, Massachusetts on 28 Oct 1717, ROBERT/ROBARD? EDMONDS, 1688-1749.

Children of Robert and Abigail (Doughty) Edmonds:
3. i. GEORGE³ EDMONDS, (Abigail², Thomas¹), 1718-?
3. ii. ELIZABETH³ EDMONDS, (Abigail², Thomas¹), 1720-?
3. iii. JOSEPH³ EDMONDS, (Abigail², Thomas¹), 1724-1795
3. iv. JOHN³ EDMONDS, (Abigail², Thomas¹), 1738-1816

2. vii. PATIENCE DOUGHTY, (Thomas¹), was born probably in Saco, York, Maine about 1680. She died at Windham, Windham, CT on 18 Oct 1726. She married at Salem, Massachusetts on 13 Mar 1706/7, BENJAMIN FOLLET, Lieutenant, 1676-1752.

Children of Benjamin and Patience (Doughty) Follet:
3. i. ELIZABETH³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1707-1778
3. ii. ABIGAIL³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1709-1784
3. iii. HANNAH³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1710-1716
3. iv. MARY³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1711-1751
3. v. SUSANNAH³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1712-1748
3. vi. BENJAMIN³ DOUGHTY FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1715-1788
3. vii. REBECKAH³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1716-?
3. viii. HEZEKIAH³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1717-1782
3. ix. JOSEPH³ FOLLET, (Patience², Thomas¹), 1721-1724

Pacenc Late Wife Of ___ Benjamin Follet Who Died ___ Headstone at Windham, Windham, Connecticut

Sources and Notes:
Google Documents, shared by Sharon Alexander:
~”Thomas Doughty 1630 Scotland
Married Elizabeth Bullie 24 Jan 1669 in Saco”
Genealogical dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire by Noyes, Libby, Davis
Part III, page 200 https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE206
~Scotch Exiles in New England Author Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn, Maine Historical Society Coll. 733 Coll. 831. Probate records of Thomas’ will (James) (pg 72)
~History of the town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) with genealogical notes by Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn, 1850-1927; Thompson, Lucien, b. 1859; Meserve, Winthrop Smith, b. 1838 (vol 1)
~The First Permanent Settlement in Maine by Everett S. Stackpole Excerpt from Sprague’s Journal of Maine History, Vol. XIV, No. 4 (Prepared for the meeting of the Piscataqua Pioneers at South Berwick, August 18, 1926.)
~Androscoggin Historical Society Lewiston – Auburn Maine. “Ancestry of John A Hicks and Ada Rowe Hicks 1600-1952” LDS Film 007725058 image 256; Roll GM 1266
~Historical Memoranda of Ancient Dover, NH by John Scales and Alonzo Quint
~Early Vital Records of Saco and Biddeford, Me., New England Historical Genealogical Register, vol 71
~New England Marriages Prior to 1700
~History of Saco and Biddeford, with notices of other early settlements,… by George Folsom
~Lamprey River online Lesson 6 PEOPLE OF THE RIVER (1) – need original source (http://www.lampreyriver.org/education-and-outreach-curriculum-lesson-6)
~[Wooden Buildings in Early Maine and New Hampshire: A technological . . . by R. Candee Thomas Doughty, another of Hill’s first seven Scots, ]
~Mentioned in John Cutt’s (first president of New Hampshire) will, sec 3d http://www.seacoastnh.com/brewster/5.html
~The History of Portland, from Its First Settlement, With Notices of the Neighbouring Towns, and of the Changes of Government in Maine… – William Willis page 13
~On Thu, Oct 11, 2018 at 9:05 PM Karen Doughty <> wrote: Re: Samuel and Sarah Mann Doughty – I have found a death certificate for Harriet Doughty Getchell that indicates Samuel and Sarah Mann Doughty of Topsham were her parents. Harriet was born in 1824. I have also found information in the book, History of Woodstock, Me., with Family Sketches and an Appendix by William Berry Lapham, 1882. There is a segment on Samuel B. Doughty, whose parents were also Samuel and Sarah Mann Doughty. Samuel B. was born in 1805. It looks like they may have had 12 children between the years 1805 and 1824. From the History of Woodstock: ” Samuel B. Doughty came here in 1854 and settled in Sigotch. He was by trade a calker and after he came here he frequently spent portions of his summers working at his trade in the ship-yards of Bath. He was born in Topsham, October 16, 1805; was the son of Samuel and Sarah (Mann) Doughty, the former born in Topsham, in 1781, and the latter in Gloucester, Mass, 1785; grandson of Stephen and Hannah (Wallis) Doughty, the former born on the “Great Island” in Harspwell, and the latter in Gloucester, Mass. The grandfather of Stephen Doughty is said to have been a Scotchman. Samuel B. Doughty, who came here, was married Nov. 7, 1833, to Mary Willson, who was born in Bowdoin, February 19, 1815. “
~Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948. The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin Meaning and History, (New York : New York Public Library & Readex Books, 1962), First published in 1946. “Doughty” is a Scottish surname.
~Carol Gardner wrote: “If the James Douty on your tree is the one who resided in Portland (then called “Falmouth”) Maine after about 1715, and married Mary Robinson (from Hampton or “Quamscuk,” NH), he was the third son of Thomas Doughty. I can’t speak to later generations of his family, except to say that his son David settled on Chebeague Island, Maine.” ~ Carol Gardner
~Thomas Doughty at Geni.com.
~On 9 April 2018, Virginia (Doughty) Vaught said,
Please add me as a descendant & researcher of Thomas Doughty/Dowty 1630-1705. My line:
Thomas Doughty/Dowty (1630-1705)
James Doughty (1680-1760)
David Doughty (1720-1800)
Stephen Doughty (1750-1834)
Stephen W Doughty (1777-1855)
Stephen W Doughty (Jr) (1801-1845)
Isaiah Doty (1827-1900)
Frank Edward Doty (1853-1912)
Merle William Doty (1880-1945)
Ernest William Doty (1903-1990)
Margaret Rae Doty (1934-1995)
Virginia Marie Doughty (This is me)
Thank you,
Virginia (Doughty) Vaught
Nampa, Idaho
~In March 2018, Robert Doughty () said:
“I’m not sure this is the same family, but the Province and Court Records of Maine, Volume 1, Page 272 show Thomas Doughty (my ancestor) was a grand jury member, September 18, 1666 in court at Cascoe and Kittery, Maine. At this court session, Thomas Chick was indicted for misbehavior. Thomas Chick and Thomas Doughty engaged themselves in a bond of 10 pounds that Chick “shall be of good behavior towards all persons, especially toward the wife of Davie Hamilton.”
~On 28 March 2018, Diane McCabe said, “James [Doughty²] owned land on Queen Street, Portland, Maine. Plot plan is on file at Portland City Hall. He later sold his land, and moved to Cape Elizabeth (now South Portland). I have not been able to find where he is buried. Maine Historical Society assisted me with my search.”
~On 8 Oct 2016, Karen Doughty said:
After my dad (an only child), in reverse order, and all in Berwick/Falmouth/Brunswick/Topsham/Auburn:
Gen 3: Fred E. Doughty and Augusta Wellman
Gen 4: Fred A. Doughty and Isabelle Leighton
Gen 5: Alvin S. Doughty and Lelia Smith
Gen 6: George L. Doughty and Sabrina ?
Gen 7: Samuel Doughty and Sarah Mann
Gen 8: Stephen Doughty and Hannah Wallace
Gen 9: David Doughty and Sarah Getchell
Gen 10: James Doughty and Mary Robinson
Gen 11: Thomas Doughty and Elizabeth Bully
~In 2016, Carol Gardner said:
“I’m a researcher for Thomas Doughty. I know that there was a Henry Brown in Maine who lived much of his life with James Orr. They were both Dunbar prisoners and both started as slaves of Valentine Hill at Oyster River. Later, they moved to Wells, Maine where they operated a mill with another Scot, Robert Stewart. Thomas Doughty had a couple of lumber contracts with them, and may have resided with, or near them, during King Philip’s War.”


Scots at Oyster River
Thomas Doughty (abt. 1630-abt. 1705)
By B. Craig Stinson

Thomas Doughty, got his start working at Valentine Hill’s mill and also cutting a road for him in 1660. He soon gained repute as a lumberman and an owner of mills, including the Great Works mill, the Saco mills, and his own mill at Doughty’s Falls at Berwick. He was often the bondsman for a Scot in trouble, including in 1664 when Peter Grant was to appear in court on the charge of bigamy. He died about 1705, about 75 years of age.

Thomas Doughty, aka Dowty
#19 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

GDMNH 200:
Born abt 1630 (about 70 in 1700)
1658 – received as an inhabitant of Dover [HTDNH 78]
Abt 1660 – lived with Valentine Hill, cut a road for Hill to his meadow at Wheelwright’s Pond; Hill paid Doughty £10 for cutting the road [HTDNH 78]
1661-1665 – taxed at Oyster River
1663 – he and John Wingate were partners in a logging contract
5 Jul 1664 – Thomas Doughty was bondsman promising that Peter Grant would appear in court to answer on the charge of bigamy.
Doughty gained high repute as a lumberman
Succeeded Roger Plaisted at the Great Works mill [also OKAHF 129]
Must have had a mill of his own at Doughty’s Falls, Berwick
1667 – removed to the mill at upper Kittery and the Saco Falls mills with Henry Brown and James Orr [GDMNH 114]
24 Jan 1669-70 – married Elizabeth Bully (aka Bulie) at Saco
before Philip’s War [1675] had removed to Wells, where he remained throughout that conflict
1686 – was a tenant of Mrs. Bridget Phillip’s mill at Saco
His petition to Andros mentioned a gristmill built by himself
1688 – Saco town treasurer
In the next war he withdrew to Malden
He was often bondsman for a Scot in trouble
HTDNH 78 says the Indians drove him from Wells to Salem, MA, where he died about 1705
Estate settled 1710
7 children named; many descendants

Sources:
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, p. 78.
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, pp. 114, 200.
OKAHF Old Kittery and Her Families, Everett S. Stackpole, Lewiston, Maine, Press of the Lewiston Journal Company, 1903, p. 129.

B. Craig Stinson
July 24, 2016
______________________________________________________________

~I believe this excerpt about Thomas Doughty from p. 78 of Stackpole’s History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, refers to the Thomas Dowty #19 being researched by this group. ~ Craig Stinson
Thomas Doughty was received as an inhabitant of Dover in 1658. He was born in 1630, as a deposition shows. In this deposition he declares that he worked for Valentine Hill and cut a road for Hill to his meadow at Wheelwright’s Pond, where said Hill built a house and kept cattle. Hill paid Doughty ten pounds for cutting the road. Doughty removed to Great Works, South Berwick, and managed the sawmill there a short time. He married, 24 June 1669, Elizabeth Bulie of Saco. The Indians drove him from Wells to Salem, Mass., where he died about the year 1705. He left children, viz., James who married, 10 April 1707, Mary Robinson in Hampton, N.H., and settled in Cape Elizabeth, Me.; Joseph of Salem; Elizabeth who married Thomas Thomes and went to Falmouth, Me.; Benjamin; Margaret, who married Samuel Wilson of Malden, Mass.; Abigail who married in Lynn, Mass., 28 October 1717, Robert Edmonds; and Patience who married Benjamin Follett of Salem, Mass. The descendants of Thomas Doughty are many in Maine and Massachusetts.” ~Shared by Craig Stinson

Essex County, MA- Probate File Papers, 1638-1881 (3) 2
Essex County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1638-1881.Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (From records supplied by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives.)

Vital Records from The NEHGS Register (2)
Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.)

Legal Issues, shared by Ray Dusek:
~As early as 1661, he was having legal troubles, and the York County court records in Maine are our source of Thomas and his legal activities over the next several years.
~In 1661 Leeft (Fafayette) Phillips sued Thomas to recover debt of 11 pounds 11 shillings 7-1/2 pence and court costs.
~Three years later Thomas sued Ensign John Barrett for 21 pounds 9 shilling and Court cost of 26 pence.
~That same year John Barrett sued Thomas for breach of contract and was awarded his claim plus court costs.
~Again on 13 September 1664, when the court met in Saco, John Barrett Sr. of Wells, brought action against Doughty for `unjust molestation` and the court found for the defendant.
~When court convened in June of 1664 there was a case before it involving one Peter Grant (Grant was a documented deported prisioner on the UNITY with Thomas) who had been living with one Joane Grant, widow, without having been officially married to her.
~ She, `being bigg with child` the court accepted a bond of 20 pounds from Thomas Doughty who garenteed that Peter would `maintayne the child`. Little did Thomas realize that he would be in a similar predicament in five years time.
~At the end of 1666 Grand Jury meeting, Thomas Doughty and Thomas Chicke “do ingage themselves in a bond of ten pounds unto our sovereign Lord the King, that said Chicke shall be of good behavior towards all persons, especially toward the wife of Davie Hamilton (another UNITY prisoner).”
~In 1667, he was sued by Alexander Maxwell (another UNITY prisoner) for “not payment of a debt due, to the value of 13 pounds 10 shilling with damages”.
~About the same time, James Warrine (a UNITY prisioner) brought action against Doughty for not paying a debt.
~On 7 July 1670, he payed a fine of 10 shillings. Two days earlier the Court entry reads “Wee present Thomas Doughty and Elizabeth.
~Doughty for having a child unlawfully begotton” and then, “Thomas Doughty ownes the presentation in Court, fined 5 pounds and paying the officers fee 5 shillings with an admonition is discharged”.
~For a change, in 1671, Thomas filed a suit which he won and recieved 10 pounds 26 shillings and 40 shillings for cost.
~Then on 4 July 1671 he was sued over the “taking away of pine loggs”.
~Twice during 1673, George Norton brought suit at York meeting of the Court. Once, Norton was allowed costs for not prosecuting his action against Doughty. The next year, Norton again sued Thomas Doughty over an unpayed debt.
~At the same meeting of the Court, Doughty went bail for Richard Gibson, who had struck his commanding officer, Captian Charles Frost, while he, Gibson, had been intoxicated. The bail of 20 pounds was to garentee Gibson’s good behavior. The Court stipulated that the “said Richard Gibson hereby stands Ingaged to performe honest service unto said Doughty for one whole years tyme”. At the end of this service, Doughty was to pay Gibson about 76 pounds for his services satisfactorally rendered. (Sinnett, in his Doughty Genealogy, states that Thomas’ wife was Elizabeth Gibson, so was Richard Gibson, Thomas’s brother-in-law and did Elizabeth Gibson die before Thomas married Elizabeth Bully?)
~Not all of Thomas’ problems were civil ones, for we find that the Court at Yorke, under the date of 6 July 1675, entered the following, “Wee present Thomas and his wife for not frequenting the publique worship of God on the Lords days according to law”.
~In 1676, Norton was again suing Thomas Doughty, James Dare and Hene Browne, but this time the Court found for the defendants.
~Then on 2 April 1678, Thomas sued under two different suits. Both against H. Sayword over fifty thousand-one hundred foote of boards and the Court called them ‘non-suits’.
~In 1681, Thomas appeared in Kittery Court to pay the fine of Abra Collins, ‘common lyar and drunkard’, and six months later he paid a second time for the same scotsman.
~Again in 1685 and twice in 1689, Thomas was involved in a couple of judgements and a suit for the withholding of payment of his debts.
~Thomas often went bond for Scotsmen, when court problems arose. He must have been a man of means to be able to continue putting up bail for others, but he may have been repaid in full for work that he was able to get out of these unfortunates, who had run afoul of the law.

  1. “Thomas Doutie maried Elyzabeth Bullie Jan 24 1669” Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21135/126/426743779 []

Sinclair, John

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published on: 1 Feb 2016, Updated: 24 May 2019
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


John Sinclair, #97 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 252, John is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Sinclair/Sinkler/Sinklar, John. Residences: Exeter NH. Appears: 1659. D.1700. Probably worked for Nicholas Lissen. [Exiles; DR; SPOWS]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JOHN SINCLAIR, was born presumably in Scotland about 1612 and died in New Hampshire in 1700.

Biographical Notes:
1. It is believed that John Sinclair/Sinkler was a Battle of Dunbar prisoner of war and arrived in Massachusetts Bay in late 1650.
2. “the seven men who were indentured to Nicholas Lissen were: John Bean, John Barber, Alexander Gordon, John Sinclair, John Hudson, John Thompson, and Walter Jackson. All were to be lifetime friends of John Bean” (Bean 1977:6)
3. The Scottish POWs specifically mentioned by Barbara of the Exeter Historical Society are: Alexander Gordon, Henry Magoon, John MacBean and John Sinclair.

Sources and Notes:
Possibly lived in Exeter, NH, see Exeter History Minute
John Sinkler of Exeter, New Hampshire by Rand Greubel
Here are two excellent sites with information about John Sinclair and his family:
Who was John Sinkler?
Sinklers of Exeter

Rankin, Andrew

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published on: 05 Jan 2015, Updated: 24 May 2019
Researchers: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust and B. Craig Stinson.
Editor: Teresa Rust


Andrew Rankin, #94 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 254, Andrew is categorized as: Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Rankin/Rainking/Raynking/Raynkine, Andrew. Residences: York ME. Appears: 1667. D.1677. Associated with other Scots at York, and has a Scottish name, but appears quite late. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8] For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Scottish POW DNA Study: Group 1-B

First Generation in the New World

1. ANDREW¹ RANKIN, was born, probably in Scotland about 1625 and died, probably at Scotland, York County, Maine in 1677. He married, on 4 Dec 1667, MARTHA MERRY.

Biographical Notes:
They had 5 children between 1668-1677.
1669: bought deed to land in York County, Maine.1

Children of Andrew and Martha (Merry) Rankin:
2. i. MARY² RANKIN, b. prob. in Scotland, ME in 1668; d. in Scotland, ME in 1753.
2. ii. CONSTANT² RANKIN, b. in Scotland, ME in 1669; d. in Scotland, ME in 1749.
2. iii. ANDREW² RANKIN, Jr., b. in Scotland, ME in 1671.
2. iv. (_____) RANKIN,
2. v. (_____) RANKIN,


Scots at Oyster River
Andrew Rankin (d. 1677)
by B. Craig Stinson
10 August 2016

Andrew Rankin, was probably indentured to Valentine Hill. He was in court for fathering a child out of wedlock with Martha Merry. They were allowed to marry shortly before the child was born. Ten years later, Andrew and six of his neighbors, including fellow Scot John Curmuckhell, were slain by Indians as they were clearing ground for the spring planting.

#94 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

A Junkins family history names Valentine Hill as Andrew Rankin’s original owner. That same history says Valentine Hill also owned Robert Junkins [#42 DPL] and Micum McIntire [#61 DPL]. http://junkinsfamilyassociation.wikidot.com/robert-junkins-story

GDMNH 577:
12 Nov 1667 – admitted he was the father of Martha Merry’s unborn child. James Grant and Robert Junkins were his bondsmen.
[Note: most Junkins family histories fail to mention this story.]
4 Dec 1667 – Andrew Rankin and Martha Merry married.
About January 1668 – son Constant Rankin was born
They lived at “Scotland” [“Junkins Garrison House, South Berwick Road (State Route 91), Scotland, York County, ME“]
They had 5 children between 1668-1677.
On 7 April 1677 he was one of the seven York men who were slain by Indians in the Brixham section while clearing ground for spring planting. The victims included Andrew Rankin, Lewis Bean, John Frost, John Palmer, William Roans, and Isaac Smith, who was visiting from Chelsea, in addition to Curmuckhell. [HYM 282]
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thurtle-walker&id=I317
He left a 60-acre homestead.
Rankin’s widow Martha remarried Philip Frost.

Sources:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine
http://junkinsfamilyassociation.wikidot.com/robert-junkins-story
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thurtle-walker&id=I317
History of York, Maine, vol. 1, Charles Edward Banks, Boston: Society for the Preservation of Historical Landmarks in York County, 1931-1935, p. 282
Not listed in History of Durham, New Hampshire
Not listed in Old Kittery and Her Families
Not listed in Old Eliot

B. Craig Stinson
August 10, 2016
______________________________________________________________
for Andrew Rankin:
The Rankin family were landholders in Ayre in 1306, when Robert Bruce (Robert I) became the first King of Scotland. The Ancestors of the Rankin family were Scots who came from Northern Ireland.

Andrew Rankin was a member of the Scottish army that was defeated at Dunbar by Oliver Cromwell in 1650. Andrew was taken prisoner and held in and English prison until November, 1650. At the time, Andrew was one of 150 prisoners who were shipped to the New England Colonies for compulsory servitude. They arrived in Boston, on the ship “Unity”, Augustine Walker, Commander, in December, 1650. Sixty of these prisoners were “sold” to the Iron Works at Saugus, Mass. The remainder were “sold” to various owners in New England.

Andrew Rankin and several of his fellow prisoners settled in York, Maine in 1667, after their period of compulsory servitude was ended.

Children of Andrew¹ Rankin and Martha Merry are:
2 i. Mary² Rankin, b. 1668 in York, Maine; d. 1753 in York, Maine.
+ 3 ii. Constant² Rankin, b. 1669 in York, Maine; d. 1749 in York, Maine.
4 iii. Andrew² Rankin Jr., b. 1671 in York, Maine.

Genealogical Dictionary of New England, – Vol. I-IV (4). Boston, 1860-1862. (3:507)
Rankin, Andrew, York, d. before 1678, leaving five children and widow Martha, who married Philip Frost.
~from Cape Cod Genes 1.6 – Person Sheet

  1. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB84/i/7514/131/6303464 []