McIntire, Malcolm

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Malcolm M’Intire, #61 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list


First Generation in the New World

1. MALCOLM MCINTIRE, was born, presumably in Scotland about 1635 and died at York, York County, Maine, about 1705. He married on 4 Sep 1671, DOROTHY PIERCE.

Biographical Notes:
1. “And there was Micum McIntire
With his great foot and hand,
He kicked and cuffed Sam Treathy so
He could neither go or stand.”
From Descendants of Micum McIntire (See Below)
2. Malcolm McIntire’s history and genealogy are well documented. There are several books written about him. See below in Sources and Notes.
3. Facebook: Micum McIntire Clan Association
4. Twitter: @MicumMcintireClanAssociation
5. IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell,in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 250, Malcolm is categorized as: Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] McIntire/McIntyre/Macintire/Mackeyntire/Mackatier/Mecantire, Micum/Malcolm/Michum/Micome/Micom. Residences: Berwick, York ME, Dover NH. Appears: 1659. D.1705. One of Valentine Hill’s seven Scots. Married the widow of Alexander McNair. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8; App.B] For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.

Children of Malcolm and Dorothy (Pierce) McIntire:
2. i. JOHN MCINTIRE, b. at York, Maine in 1677; m. SUSANNA YOUNG.
2. ii. MALCOLM MCINTIRE, b. at York in 1683; d. on 21 Oct 1755; m. on 9 July 1706, JANE GRANT.
2. iii. ALEXANDER MCINTIRE, born at York died prior to 1700; Unmarried.
2. iv. DANIEL MCINTIRE, b. at York in 1684; d. 1774; Unmarried.

Second Generation

2. i. JOHN MCINTIRE, (Malcolm¹), was born at York, Maine in 1677 and died at York on 2 Dec 1771. He married, before 1707, SUSANNA YOUNG.

Children of John and Susanna (Young) McIntire:
3. i. JOSEPH MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 25 March 1707; d. at York on 25 June 1730; Unmarried.
3. ii. SUSANNA MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 16 May 1709; d. 9 Dec 1797; m. JOSEPH MAIN.
3. iii. JOHN MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), at York on 25 Feb 1711; m. ABIGAIL WEBBER.
3. iv. HANNAH MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 6 Nov 1712; d. abt. 1775; m. ALEXANDER JUNKINS, son of Alexander and Catherine (Stackpole) Junkins.
3. v. EBENEZER MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 16 April 1714; m. MERCY RANDEL.
3. vi. DANIEL MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 5 Sep 1717; m. MERCY JUNKINS.
3. vii. SAMUEL MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 20 Sep 1721; m. SARAH CAME.

2. ii. MALCOLM/MICUM MCINTIRE, (Malcolm¹), b. in 1683; d. on 21 Oct 1755; m. on 9 July 1706[8], JANE GRANT, of Berwick, Maine, daughter of WILLIAM GRANT.

Biographical Notes:

Maine: Early Wills and Deeds, 1640-1760. CD-ROM. Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.)
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB84/i/7511/269/22205927

Children of Malcolm/Micum and Jane (Grant) McIntire:
3. i. ALEXANDER MCINTIRE, (Malcolm², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 9 June 1709; m. MARY WEARE.
3. ii. KEZIAH MCINTIRE, (Malcolm², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 13 May 1713; m. JOSEPH CAME.
3. iii. MARY MCINTIRE, (Malcolm², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 15 April 1716; d. before 1743.

2. iii. ALEXANDER MCINTIRE,(John², Malcolm¹), died prior to 1700; Unmarried.

2. iv. DANIEL MCINTIRE,(John², Malcolm¹), b. 1684; d. 1774; Unmarried.

Third Generation

3. i. JOSEPH MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 25 March 1707; d. at York on 25 June 1730; Unmarried.
3. ii. SUSANNA MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 16 May 1709; d. 9 Dec 1797; m. JOSEPH MAIN.
3. iii. JOHN MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), at York on 25 Feb 1711; m. ABIGAIL WEBBER. Capt. John, a merchant and ship builder.

Children of Capt. John and Abigail (Webber) McIntire:
4. i. JOSEPH MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. LUCY KINGSBURY.
4. ii. ABIGAIL MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. JAMES CARLILE.
4. iii. SAMUEL MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. 1st, DOROTHY ROGERS, m. 2nd, MARY JOHNSON.
4. iv. SUSANNA MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. EBENEZER BLAISDELL.
4. v. THEODORE MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. 1st, RHODA MOULTON, m. 2nd, ANNA SMITH, m. 3rd, MARGARET HOOPER.
4. vi. PHINEAS MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. LUCY STOVER.
4. vii. ELIZABETH MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. SAMUEL LUNT.
4. viii. DORCAS MCINTIRE, (Malcolm³, John², Malcolm¹), m. 1st, TOBIAS FERNALD, m. 2nd, Capt. RICHARD ROGERS.

3. iv. HANNAH MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 6 Nov 1712; d. abt. 1775; m. ALEXANDER JUNKINS, son of Alexander and Catherine (Stackpole) Junkins.
3. v. EBENEZER MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 16 April 1714; m. MERCY RANDEL.
3. vi. DANIEL MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 5 Sep 1717; m. MERCY JUNKINS.
3. vii. SAMUEL MCINTIRE, (John², Malcolm¹), b. at York on 20 Sep 1721; m. SARAH CAME.


Published: 4 Jan 2015
Updated: 10 Apr 2020
Researchers: Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, Jonathan Tucker
Editor: Teresa Rust


Scots at Oyster River
Micum McIntire (d. 1704)
By B. Craig Stinson on 26 July 2016

Screen Shot 2016-09-02 at 6.48.43 PM 2
Micom Mecantire marck, 1700

Micum McIntire first worked the mills for Valentine Hill either at Oyster River or at Cochecho Falls. After the death of fellow Scot Alexander Mackaneer, he married the widow, Dorothy Pierce Mackaneer McIntire. A few years later his brother-in-law John Curmuckhell was slain in an Indian attack, and McIntire administered Curmuckhell’s small estate. Some historical sources state that McIntire married Curmuckhell’s widow, but this is in error. He was already married to the widow’s sister. The widow, Anne Pierce Curmuckhell, later married John Bracy. About 1707 the McIntire garrison house was built. Incredibly, it is still standing. Possibly the oldest in the state of Maine, it can be seen on Cider Hill Road (state highway 91) at Scotland, York County, Maine.

McIntire-Garrison_House,_South_Berwick_Road_(State_Route_91),_Scotland_(York_County,_Maine) 2

HTDNH 82 speaks of the legend from 1650 that every 10th Scot prisoner was to be shot… McIntire ran and was wounded but not killed
[Stinson notes that the 11th Scot in line was not part of McIntire’s story!]
Stackpole thinks he worked mills Cochecho [HTDNH 82]

A Junkins family history states that Valentine Hill owned Micum McIntire, Robert Junkins, and Andrew Rankin. [http://junkinsfamilyassociation.wikidot.com/robert-junkins-story]

1659 – on Dover tax list [HTDNH 82]
11 Dec 1662 – Grant at Kittery above Salmon Falls [HTDNH 82]
1664 – Taxed Dover as “Micome the Scotchman” [HTDNH 82]
1670 – bought 40 acres from John Pierce [GDMNH 553]
before 4 Sept 1671 – married Dorothy, daughter of John Pierce and widow of Alexander Mackaneer [GDMNH 472]
1673 – wife absent from meeting [GDMNH 472]
11 Sep 1677 – McIntire administered the small estate of his slain brother-in-law, John Carmuckhell. [GDMNH 129]
Garrison house, still standing in 1913 [HTDNH 82]
17 Apr 1700 – will; wife died before he made his will [GDMNH 472]
22 Mar 1704-5 – Inventory valued at £199: 0: 0
Will is recorded in MW 141-143
three sons: John, Daniel, and Micum
[Note: in HTDNH 77, author Everett Stackpole states that McIntire married widow of John Curmuckhell about 1675. This is refuted (and probably corrected) in GDMNH 472]


For more information please contact the descendants/researchers of Malcolm McIntire.


Sources:
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp. 77, 82.
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, pp. 129, 472, 553.
http://junkinsfamilyassociation.wikidot.com/robert-junkins-story
MW Maine Wills 1640-1760, William M. Sargent, Portland: Brown Thurston and Co., 1887, pp. 141-143
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McIntire_Garrison_House
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:McIntire-Garrison_House,_South_Berwick_Road_(State_Route_91),_Scotland_(York_County,_Maine).jpg

B. Craig Stinson
July 23, 2016


SOURCES AND NOTES:
On 03 Oct 2018, Jonathan Tucker shared, “I wanted to suggest adding to the timeline of recorded events on Micum’s page that he received a grant of land on the southwest side of the York River from the town of York in 1668, while he was still working at the mills at Newichawannock/Salmon Falls/South Berwick. Micum did not actually move to York and build a house there until after he purchased the 40 acres from John Pierce on the north side of the river in 1670. Also, according to the list of wages and bills unpaid by Salmon Falls mill owner John Wincoll for the period Dec. 6, 1662 through April 6, 1671, Micum was owed 28 pounds. It’s not clear that Micum worked there all that time–though he may have–but that was the period over which the mill owner in question fell delinquent in his wages and bills. I hope that’s helpful. Finally, although I cannot find it archived online, you might want to cite as a source, “Descendants of Micum McIntire,” Robert Harry McIntire, 1983 (revised edition), Bookcrafters, Chelsea, Michigan. It remains at this point the dated but definitive genealogy.”

Maine Wills, 1640-1760
Maine Wills, 1640-1760

McIntire, Robert Harry. Descendants of Micum McIntire, A Scottish Highlander, deported by Oliver Cromwell after the Battle of Dunbar, September 3, 1650, and settled at York, Maine, about 1668, (Rutland, Vermont: Tuttle Company, 1940)

McIntier, Donald and Sandra. The McIntier Family History Album, found at www.mcintier.com (with Contributions from Caroline McIntier Carrado, Elaine McIntyre Perry and Lucy McIntire Ahern)

McIntire, Robert Harry. Descendants of Micum McIntire: a Scottish Highlander, deported by Oliver Cromwell after the battle of Dunbar, September 3, 1650, and settled at York, Maine, about 1668. (Madison: Tuttle Company, 1940). (Google eBook, 2007).

Dobson, David. Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785. (Athens: University of Georgia, 1994, Paperback Version, 2004), 37. “York, Maine, Malcolm McIntyre, probate 2 October 1705”

YouTube Video made on location by Bill Bowles, a descendant of Malcolm M’Intire, The Battle of Dunbar

In the book, Descendants of Micum McIntire (see above) says Malcolm/Micum was one of three sons of Malcolm R. Mcintire of Argyll, Scotland. The document below says…”One of three sons of Ebenezer MacIntire of Argyle” See page 15 below:

Iron Works Document supplied by Ray Rolla McCall
Iron Works Document supplied by Ray Rolla McCall

Junkins, Robert

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 23 Dec 2014, Updated: 2 Mar 2019
Page contributors: Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson, Rosann Beauvais


Robert Junkins, #42 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list1


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018),2 on page 250, Robert is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Junkins/Jenkins/Junkes/Jongkin/Gunkens, Robert. Residences: Oyster River NH, York ME. Appears: 1657. D.1699. Possibly one of Valentine Hill’s Scots. Appears at Oyster River at the same time as Scots likely to have been prisoners. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8; App.B]345 167

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Robert Junkins’ Garrison House, built about 1660 in York County, Maine. Brush and oil paint on canvas by Winslow Homer in July 1875.


First Generation in the New World

1. ROBERT¹ JUNKINS, born at Brechin, Angus, Scotland about 1621. He died at Scotland Parish, York County, Maine in November 1699. He married in York County*, about 1664/6*, SARAH SMYTH/SMITH*, of Cape Neddick.

Biographical Notes:
1. “one third of the inhabitants of Brechin, where Dunbar survivor Robert Junkins came from (Chapters 7 and 8), died in the plague of 1647/ 8.191” from: Gerrard, Chris; Graves, Pam; Millard, Andrew; Annis, Richard. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650 (Kindle Locations 3223-3224). Oxbow Books. Kindle Edition.
2. Junkins’ Garrison – York, Maine – Helpful timeline
3. Robert Junkins’ Story
Use with caution

Children of Robert and Sarah (Smyth/Smith) Junkins:
2. i. JOSEPH² JUNKINS, born about 1672; d. at Scotland Parish, Maine on 6 April 1711 (by Indians)
2. ii. ALEXANDER² JUNKINS, was probably born in York County, Maine about 1675. He married in Maine by 1701, CATHERINE STACKPOLE, daughter of James Stacpole/Stackpole and Margaret Warren. Margaret Warren was the daughter of JAMES WARREN (Probable Dunbar Prisoner).
2. iii. DANIEL² JUNKINS, born about 1680;

Second and Third Generations

2. i. JOSEPH² JUNKINS, was probably born in York County, about 1672 and died at Scotland Parish, Maine on 6 April 1711 (by Indians). He married, widow, ABIGAIL (INGERSOLL) LEWIS.

Children of Joseph and Abigail (Ingersoll) Junkins:
3. i. JOSEPH³ JUNKINS, may have been born in Scotland Parish and was born about July 1710. (He was 9 months old at his father’s death.)
3. ii. JOHN³ JUNKINS, was born on 21 Sep 1711

2. ii. ALEXANDER² JUNKINS, was probably born in York County, Maine about 1675. He married in Maine by 1701, CATHERINE STACKPOLE.

2. iii. DANIEL² JUNKINS, was probably born in York County, Maine about 1680.


Scots at Oyster River
Robert Junkins (d. 1699)
by B. Craig Stinson
23 July 2016

Robert Junkins gradually acquired land in upper York, or Scotland Parish. He constructed a fortified garrison house and became a farmer, or “planter.” His story is recounted in Junkins family histories found on a well-maintained website, and an artifact from his home, the cradle that rocked his sons, is preserved in the Old Gaol Museum at York, Maine. Junkins died in 1699, and his will is recorded in Maine Wills 1640-1760. His son Joseph died in a horrific way in an Indian attack in 1711.

Robert Junkins, aka Robard Junkes
#42 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

Junkins family histories name Valentine Hill as his original owner. That same history says Valentine Hill also owned Andrew Rankin [#94 DPL] and Micum McIntire [#61 DPL].

HTDNH 81:
1657 taxed at Oyster River
1657 bought land Oyster River with Edward “Urine” and Henry Brown [GDMNH 394]
1663 taxed at Oyster River as “Robard Junkes”
By 1662 had a garrison house in upper York (“Scotland”) that was still standing in early 1900’s [GDMNH 394]
1667 Junkins and James Grant were bondsmen for Andrew Rankin
before 1670 wife was Sarah Smith “Junckins” [Junkins family history]
22 March 1681 took oath of allegiance at York
2 March 1696-7 – will
3 Dec 1699 inventory returned; £90:13 [Maine Wills 128-129]
3 children named: Joseph, Alexander, and Daniel

“With an original holding of six acres, he built his homestead at Scotland on a rise overlooking the York river where he retained command of his farm lands and orchards for the remainder of his life, adding to his land holding from time to time – 20 acres on 24th March 1680, a further 32 acres in the same year, and another parcel for an orchard and barn on 10 June 1681. Before 1670 he married Sarah Smyth of Cape Neddick. They had three sons, Joseph (b. 1672), Alexander (b. 1675) and Daniel (b. circa 1680). The cradle in which they were rocked (and their children and grandchildren) is now in the Old Gaol Museum of the Old York Historic Society.”
http://junkinsfamilyassociation.wikidot.com/robert-junkins-story
Robert’s son Joseph Junkins was killed by five Indians near the Scotland garrison April 6, 1711:
“Joseph Junkins was stripped, scalped, and left for dead, but arose and walked to the garrison, gave an account and lived two hours.” [GDMNH 394]
Joseph’s wife Abigail Ingersoll Lewis Junkins (already once a widow) was left with a 9-month-old son Joseph and was pregnant with John, who was born 21 Sept 1711. [GDMNH 394]
“Robert’s will is dated 2 March 1696 and, with his mark at the bottom, is lodged in the York County Court House in Alfred, Maine. It was witnessed by John Hancock, Arthur Bragdon, Jr. and Joseph Pray in 1697, this John Hancock being the grandfather of the John Hancock who signed the American Declaration of Independence. On 2 January 1699, the will was recorded, and in November of the same year he died. Robert’s wife Sarah inherited and when she died on 20 March 1718, it was Alexander2 who inherited the homestead, for his older brother Joseph had been killed by Indians near the Garrison house on 2 April 1711.”

“Robert Junkins was born in Scotland and he died at Scotland. He was assigned to enslavement at Durham and he worked in bondage in Durham. But the Scotlands and the Durhams were an ocean apart, and so may be seen in the individual life of one christened in Brechin Cathedral the tumult, dislocation, anguish, near death, enslavement and renewed hope which those who could count themselves fortunate among Scots experienced in his times.”
http://junkinsfamilyassociation.wikidot.com/robert-junkins-story

Sources:
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, p. 81.
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, p. 394.
Maine Wills 1640-1760, William M. Sargent, Portland: Brown Thurston and Co., 1887, pp. 128-129.
http://junkinsfamilyassociation.wikidot.com/robert-junkins-story

B. Craig Stinson
July 23, 2016


Sources and Notes:

Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.
Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.

Early Maine Deeds and Wills. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.)
YORK DEEDS, Volume 5, Page 260. Early Maine Deeds and Wills. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.)

Early Maine Deeds and Wills. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.)
Early Maine Deeds and Wills. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.)

“Kittery, Maine, Probate 2 Jan 1699” From: Dobson, David. Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785. (Athens: University of Georgia, 1994, paperback version, 2004), 36.


For additional help, please go to the:
Descendants and Researchers List and the Facebook Group.
(Our small website team is unable to help with further research.)



  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ [] []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 247. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  5. Stinson, B. Craig. “‘Oyster River Scots.’” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 3 June 2018, scottishprisonersofwar.com/oyster-river-scots-by-b-craig-stinson/. []
  6. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  7. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Ch. 7, 8, Appendix B, p. 257-284. []

Furbish, William

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 16 Dec 2014
Updated: 07 Mar 2020
Researchers: Jessica Allen (Furbish) Anderson, Ray Dusek, Heidi Lamonica, Andrew Millard, Marian Novak, Jean Paradis, Teresa Rust
Editor: Teresa Rust


William Furbish, #26 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar List 1

Name variations: Furber, Forbes, Furbish, Furbush, Forbush, Ferbush


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (Jul 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), 2 on page 249, William is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Forbes/Furbish/Furbush/Forbush/Ferbush, William. Residences: Kittery ME, Dover NH. Appears: 1659. B.c.1631. D.1701. Clearly a Scot and acquired land in Dover at about the same time as Scots likely to have been prisoners. [Exiles; Banks; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8] 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. WILLIAM¹ FURBISH, was born in Scotland about 1631 and died at Kittery, York, Maine, before 21 Mar 1701. He married, first, at Kittery, Maine by 1669, REBECCA (_____). 10 He married, second, at Kittery by 1686, CHRISTIAN (_____). 11

Biographical Notes:
Highly Recommended! William Furbish (1631-1694) by B. Craig Stinson.
In 1659 William “Ferbush” was in the Oyster River community near Dover, New Hampshire. 12
Did he have children by his second wife?

Children of William and Rebecca (_____) Furbish:
2. i. DANIEL² FURBISH, b. at Kittery, York, Maine, 20 Mar 1664; m. DOROTHY PRAY.
2. ii. JOHN² FURBISH, b. at Kittery about 1667; died
24 Nov 1701, Lost at Sea. Never married. No children.
2. iii. HOPEWELL² FURBISH, m. 12 May 1693, ENOCH HUTCHINS, Jr.
2. iv. K/CATHERINE² FURBISH, b. about 1673; d. 1755; m. abt. 1694, ANDREW NEAL, a son of SPOW, JOHN NEALE, #81 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list.
2. v. SARAH² FURBISH, b 1671; d. 1715; m abt. 1698, THOMAS THOMPSON.
Sarah Furbish 1671-1715
2. vi. BETHIA² FURBISH, b 1677; d. 1747; m. in 1705, JOSEPH GOLD/GOOLD.
2. vii. WILLIAM² FURBISH, went to South Carolina.

Second Generation

2. i. DANIEL² FURBISH, (William¹) was born at Kittery, York, Maine, on 20 Mar 1664. He married, at Kittery, by 1689, DOROTHY PRAY, 13 she was born about 1675 and is the daughter of, JOHN and JOANNA (_____) PRAY. She was taken captive by Native Americans and her husband ransomed her back.

Children of Daniel and Dorothy (Pray) Furbish:
3. i. DANIEL³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery on 9 Mar 1690. He became a Quaker in 1759. He married in 1718, ANN LORD.
3. ii. REBECCA³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery on 19 Apr 1694. She married in Feb 1715, BENJAMIN GOULD.
3. iii. JOHN³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery on 19 Apr 1699. He married about 1722, HANNAH LITTLEFIELD.
3. JOANNA³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery on 14 Jul 1701. She married on 20 Feb 1731/2, SAMUEL FERNALD.
3. iv. WILLIAM³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery on 19 Mar 1703. He married, SARAH PREBLE. 14
3. v. DOROTHY³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery in 1704. She married, JOHN HARTFORD.
3. vi. SARAH³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery in 1706. She married on 11 Apr 1733, HATEVIL HALL.
3. vii. KATHERINE³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery in 1708 and baptized 21 Sep 1721. She married at Kittery, ROBERT ALLEN.
3. viii. JOSEPH³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery in 1710. He married 20 May 1734, ELIZABETH MEADER.
3. ix. BENJAMIN³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery in 1712. He married on 03 Jun 1740, HANNAH HUSSEY.
3. x. MARY³ FURBISH, (Daniel², William¹), b. at Kittery in 1714. Her marriage Intention was published 15 Oct 1743 to, BENJAMIN ROBERTS, a brother of Sarah who married Ebenezer Wentworth.

2. ii. JOHN² FURBISH, (William¹), was born at Kittery about 1667 and died on 24 Nov 1701, Lost at Sea. Never married. No children.

2. iii. HOPEWELL² FURBISH, (William¹), She married, first, at Kittery, on 12 May 1693, ENOCH HUTCHINS, Jr., 15 and married, second, at Kittery on 25 Apr 1711, WILLIAM WILSON, of Kittery.

Biographical Notes:
Hopewell, pregnant with her fourth child, was abducted along with her three young sons and sold to the French in Sorel, Canada, some 300 miles distant. Baby Mary Catherine was born in captivity there. Hopewell’s husband, Enoch Hutchins, Jr., was killed by Indians April 3, 1706, before any of his family were redeemed. He followed his own father’s unfortunate footsteps, as Enoch Hutchins, Sr., had been killed by Indians in May 1698.

Children of Enoch and Hopewell (Furbish) Hutchins:
3. i. _____ HUTCHINS, a son, was born at Kittery
3. ii. _____ HUTCHINS, a son, was born at Kittery
3. iii. _____ HUTCHINS, a son, was born at Kittery
3. iv. MARY CATHERINE HUTCHINS, b. at Sorel, Canada in 1705. 16

Children of William and Hopewell (Furbish) Hutchins Wilson:
3. WILLIAM WILSON, b. at Kittery on 27 Jan 1711/2 and m., EDAH BRIAR. 16
4. EDMUND WILSON,
5. EDMUND WILSON,
6. OTIS DOW WILSON,
7. LESTER ALONZO WILSON,
8. HOWARD EDMUND WILSON, ~ ancestry of Jean Paradis

2. iv. KATHERINE² FURBISH, (William¹), was born about 1673 and died in 1755. She married at Kittery about 1694, ANDREW NEAL, a son of SPOW, JOHN NEAL. 17

Children of John and Catherine (Furbish) Neal:
3. i. KATHERINE NEAL, (Catherine², William¹), b. on 4 Dec 1695; m. 22 Sep 1714, NATHANIEL AUSTIN, of Dover.
3. ii. JOHN NEAL, (Catherine², William¹), b. on 18 Oct 1698; d. 1755; m. PATIENCE JOHNSON.
3. iii. ANDREW NEAL
, (Catherine², William¹), b. 4 May 1701; d. 1757; m. DORCAS JOHNSON.
3. iv. HANNAH NEAL
, (Catherine², William¹), b. 28 May 1704; died young.
3. v. REBECCA NEAL
, (Catherine², William¹), b. 20 Jan 1706/7
3. vi. MARY NEAL
, (Catherine², William¹), b. on 17 Aug 1708; m. 12 Jan 1726, BENJAMIN HILL (1703-1788).
3. vii. JAMES NEAL, (Catherine², William¹), b. 4 May 1711; died 31 Aug 1730.

2. v. SARAH² FURBISH, (William¹), married about 1698, THOMAS THOMPSON.

Children of William and Sarah (Furbish) Thompson:
3. i. MILES³ THOMPSON, (Sarah², William¹), 1699
3. ii. SARAH THOMPSON, (Sarah², William¹), 1702-1781
3. iii. ANN THOMPSON, (Sarah², William¹), 1707-1742
3. iv. MEHITABLE THOMPSON, (Sarah², William¹), 1709-1734
3. v. THOMAS THOMPSON, (Sarah², William¹), 1712-1756

2. vi. BETHIA² FURBISH, (William¹), b 1677; d. 1747; married in 1705, JOSEPH GOULD/GOLD.

Children of Joseph and Bethia (Furbish) Gould:
3. i. WILLIAM³ GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1700-1774
3. ii. MARY³ GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1707-1762
3. iii. HANNAH³ GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1710-1712
3. iv. WILLIAM GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1711
3. v. HANNAH GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1713
3. vi. SAMUEL GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1714-1779
3. vii. WILLIAM GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1715-1751
3. viii. SARAH GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1722-1781
3. ix. JOSEPH GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1722-1797
3. x. BETHIA GOULD, (Bethia², William¹), 1723

2. vii. WILLIAM² FURBISH, (William¹), b. at Kittery in 1678; died at Craven, South Carolina in 1724. went to South Carolina. He married, BRIDGET SCREVEN (1681-1736), the daughter of Reverend WILLIAM SCREVEN.

Children of William and Bridget (Screven) Furbish:
3. i. WILLIAM³ FURBISH/FORBES, (William², William¹), b. 1703
3. ii. JOHN³ FURBISH/FORBES, (William², William¹), 1705-1706.

Why William Furbish moved to Charleston, South Carolina.

B. Craig Stinson has written 24 pages about William Furbish. Highly recommended!


Sources and Notes:
On 10 Oct 2018, Ray Dusek shared: “In 1720 it was ordered that garrisons or places of refuge should be erected at the residences of the following persons; Andrew Neal, John Gowen, Jonathan Nason, Samuel Small, Jr., Capt. John Heard, Maj. Charles Frost, John Morrell. Senr., Capt. Nicholas Shapleigh, Capt. John Leighton, David Libby, Jr.Joseph Hill, John Staple, Maj. Joseph Hammond, Widow Spinney, John Dennet, Richard King, Senr., Joseph Curtis, Richard Rogers, John Adams, Robert Cutt, Lt. Elihu Gunnison, Nathaniel Leach, Nathaniel Keen, Rev. John Newmarch, Samuel Hutchins, Nicholas Weeks, Andrew Lewis, Col. William Pepperrell, Widow Wilson, Ebenezer More, Richard Cutt, Clement Deering, and Robert Eliot. Agreeably to this order we find the following list of garrisons in the records of the town. “At a meeting of ye Military officers of ye town of Kittery together with ye Selectmen of sd Town, Sept. 15th & 17th, 1722, for ye Ordering what houses be made Defencible in sd town by virtue of An Act of ye Governmt, passed at their Session ye 7th day of Augst, 1722—Ordered thet ye several houses following be made Defencible, Vizt; 1st. Daniel Furbush. And that Allexander Forguson & Samll Shorey with their familys Lodge therein. The 10 Dover Rd House is the land where William Furbish lived the Family graveyard is on the top of the knoll with all the brush, there our 4 generations of Furbish buried there about 30 graves no headstones, William his wife his son Daniel and his wife that we know of if you want to add me to the line of William Furbish as a contributor , my e-mail The 1st attachment list the names of the wives and Husbands of Daniel and Dorothy Children “

There apparently is this INCORRECT record: William Furbish “1648 Granted land in Dover, New Hampshire (18 March 1648)” BUT, “Historian Everett S. Stackpole is both the source of the error and its correction. In Old Kittery and Her Families, 1903, p. 121, (and p. 437) he states that William Furbish is found as early as 1648 in Dover, N. H. In 1913 the same author wrote History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire. On page 79, Stackpole states: “William Furbish was taxed in Dover in 1659 as William Ferbush. The statement that he was taxed in Dover in 1648, made in Old Kittery and Her Families, is an error, the result of the misreading of the name William Furber…” ~ Submitted by Craig Stinson on 7 May 2016.

According to, Ronald Engelhorn, a descendant,All records indicate there was only one William Furbush (Forbes) living in and around Maine after 1650, most genealogist believe the 1648 listing to be a typo. Both William and his brother Daniel Furbush (Forbes) are listed on the prisoner transport list to the colonies. To date, no other William or Daniel Forbes has been found from Maine or NH.

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-11-34-37-am-2
Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn (1850-1927) and Lucien Thompson. History of the town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) with Genealogical Notes, (Durham, New Hampshire: Town of Durham, 1913).

Vital Records from The NEHGS Register.
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21073/366/1427090392

Torrey's New England Marriages to 1700 (9)
Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.


Piscataqua Settlements - Many of the place names are familiar to our SPOWs
Piscataqua Settlements – Many of the place names are familiar to our SPOWs


In ‘The Devil of Great Island: Witchcraft and Conflict in Eary New England’ by Emerson W Baker (Palgrave Macmillan 2007), page 118, is this statement: “William Furbush, who converted to Quakerism in Dover in 1662, was prosecuted in 1674 for getting Indians drunk. In 1679, he was fined for abusing the constable, whom his wife Rebecca was convicted of striking. In 1683, husband and wife were both fined for speaking against the government.” The cited references for the paragraph that includes these statements are:
Charles Pettingell, ‘Quakerism in the Piscataqua: A Historical Address Delivered Before the Piscataqua Pioneers at Exeter, New Hampshire August 7, 1945’, pp.11-13
Sybil Noyes, Charles T Libby, and Walter G Davis, eds., ‘Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire’ (1928-1939; reprint Baltimore 1979), p.251.

Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Volume 4 by William Richard Cutter, Lewis historical Publishing Company, 1908 – Boston (Mass.) Page 1966. (NEAL Family)
Piscataqua Pioneers : Register of members and ancestors, 1623-1775, JOHN SCALES, A. M., Editor, DOVER, N. H., MAY, 1919 FREE Google Book

Old Kittery and Her Families by Everett Schermerhorn Stackpole
Press of Lewiston journal Company, 1903 – Kittery (Me.) – 822 pages (Page 640 – NEAL family) FREE Google Book

William Furbish at Connected Bloodlines

Descendants of William Furbush at Family Tree Maker

“The transfer of the next lot from William Ellingham to Daniel Ferguson is not on record, but Ferguson must have settled here before 1659. when “the creek by Daniel Ferguson’s and Anthony Emery’s” is mentioned. 1 te and his neighbor. William
Furbish, together bought land further inland of James Fernery, in1667. The dividing line between F’erguson and Furbish was laidout by referees in 1680. Both prohablv came from Dover. X. 11.. where William Furbish is found as early as 1648 [??]. ” Again, the date of 1648 in INCORRECT! See above in the Biographical Notes for William Furbish. ~ Teresa

I descend from William Furbush (Forbes) through his daughter Catherine. I don’t know for sure than my information is correct, but I have in my notes that he was taken prisoner along with his brother Daniel, that they were fighting with Leslie and were part of the contingent of 150 Scottish POWs delivered up by Sir Arthur Haselrig to Augustine Walker of the ship UNITY on 11 Nov 1650. Walker sold William and Daniel Furbish (Forbes) to Samson Angier for 30 pounds each. Samson send Daniel to his brother Edmund in Cambridge and kept William with him. I also have that Daniel married Rebecca Perriman (Massachusetts Marriages, 1633-1850). The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire cites that William’s daughter Catherine married Andrew Neale on p. 251. He was the son of POW John Neale. I also descend from POWs William Alexander Gowan and Peter Grant–and, from the South, Ninian Beall. And I seem to remember that there are still others, though I can’t name them right now and can’t find their notes. Quite a legacy!~ Marian Novak

William Furbush (Listed as Furbish, #26 on Dunbar) was my 9th great grandfather, with 1 surname between us- Down the line: William Furbush w/ wife, Rebecca Perriman (shown as marrying brother Daniel as well?)
Daniel Furbush Sr.
Benjamin Furbush
Richard Furbush Sr.
Richard Furbush Jr.
David Furbush
Greenleaf A. Furbush
Forrest L. Furbush
Carrie Furbush married Hershal Paul
Private Paul
Private Paul
Me
~ Heidi Lamonica

“I descend from William Furbush through his son Daniel. One of Daniel’s many children was another William (ma. Sarah Preble). I believe he was captured at Fort William Henry in 1757 with his son, who was also named William. William and Sarah also had a son named Isaac, who married Keziah Abbott. Both Isaac and Keziah’s gravestones are located on what used to be Oak Hill cemetary, which is on family land in Sanford, ME. There are many gravestones of Furbish descendants, from the late 1700’s through 1926 in this graveyard. It’s really remarkable about all the things you can find. I’m fairly new at this, but my Dad, and great uncle have started this research for me, and I aim to continue. I would love to find some information about the Furbish/Forbes lineage from Scotland. Can anyone give me any good ideas where to start?” Thanks, Jessica Allen Furbish Anderson

Contributed by Ray Dusek.
  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 249. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Banks, C.E. 1927. ‘Scotch Prisoners deported to New England by Cromwell 1651-2’. Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 61, 4-30. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25080212 []
  5. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  6. Stinson, B. Craig. “‘Oyster River Scots.’” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 3 June 2018, scottishprisonersofwar.com/oyster-river-scots-by-b-craig-stinson/. []
  7. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ []
  8. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  9. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Ch. 7, 8. []
  10. FURBISH, William & [Rebecca] ____; by 1669; Kittery, ME {Kittery 437-8; Lord 6, 7; GDMNH 251; Forbes-Forbush; Farr Anc. 154} New England Marriages to 1700. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21174/560/426886015 []
  11. “FURBUSH, William & 2/wf? Christian ____ (?1652-); by 1686?; Kittery, ME {Kittery 461; Forbes-Forbush 16; Gould 319; GDMNH 251; Farr Anc. 154}” New England Marriages to 1700. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/i/21174/560/426886016 []
  12. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21068/249/45649273 []
  13. FORBASH, Daniel (1664, 1665?-) & Dorothy [PRAY] (1668-); by 1689?, by 1690(1?); Kittery, ME {Kittery 438, 463; Gould 320; Lord 7; Vinton Mem. 325; GDMNH 251, 565; Reg. 55:280}New England Marriages to 1700. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21174/560/426923529 []
  14. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/14321/390/264655797 []
  15. “HUTCHINS, Enoch (-1706) & Hopewell FURBISH, m/2 William WILSON 1711; 12 May 1693, ?13 May; Kittery, ME {Kittery 438, 542; GDMNH 251, 366; Forbes-Forbush; Farr Anc. 155}” New England Marriages to 1700. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21175/828/426929365 []
  16. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/14309/293/264791785 [] []
  17. NEAL, Andrew (ca 1665-1739) & Katharine/Catherine [FURBISH/ FURBUSH] (-1739+); ca 1694; Kittery, ME {Kittery 435, 640; GDMNH 251, 506; Forbes-Forbush; Farr Anc. 153, 207}New England Marriages to 1700. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21175/1080/426934934 []

Gowen, William

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 15 Dec 2014, Updated: 21 Aug 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


William Gowen (alias Smith), #38 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (Jul 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018).

On page 249, William is categorized as:
Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Gowen/Gowan/Gowin/Smith, William. Residences: Oyster River, Dover NH, Kittery ME. Appears: 1659. B.c.1634. D.1686. Clearly a Scot and acquires land in Kittery at about the same time as Scots likely to have been prisoners. [Exiles; Banks; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost lives, New Voices.


Find his descendants and researchers here.

Surname variations: Gowen, Gowan, alias Smith, Gowin, “Elexander Gowing”

Scottish Surname:
Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948. The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin Meaning and History, (New York : New York Public Library & Readex Books, 1962), First published in 1946. Page 505.: Gowan or MacGowan, MacGoun, MacGown, MacGoune in Scotland.

First Generation in the New World

1. WILLIAM¹ GOWEN* (alias SMITH*), “a Scot*,” and “carpenter*,” born in Scotland* before June 1634* and died at Berwick on 2 Apr 1686. He married at Kittery*, Maine, on 14 May 1667*, ELIZABETH¹ FROST*, the daughter of NICHOLAS FROST and BERTHA CADWALLA. She was born at Kittery on 10 May 1640.

Biographical Notes:
1. From Andrew Millard: “It seems William Gowen was initially convicted of fathering Elizabeth Frost’s child, and he subsequently married her. See Rapaport, D. 2004 Scottish Slaves in Colonial New England Part II. The Highlander 42:6 10-17.
2. William was 51 years old in June 1685, so that means he was born before June of 1634.

Children of William and Elizabeth (Frost) Gowen:
2. i. NICHOLAS² GOWEN, (William¹), b. at Kittery in 1667; married at Kittery in 1694, ABIGAIL HODSDON. (Was he born in Kittery?)
2. ii. JOHN² GOWEN, (William¹), b. 1668; d. 1733; married at Kittery on 3 Oct 1693, MERCY HAMMOND.
2. iii. WILLIAM GOWEN, (William¹), b. about 1672; killed by Indians on 12 Oct 1691.
2. iv. ELIZABETH GOWEN, (William¹), b. in 1673; m., ALEX FERGUSON.
2. v. JAMES² GOWEN, (William¹), b. 1675 m. at Kittery by 1701, MARY WHEELWRIGHT.
2. vi. MARGARET GOWEN, (William¹), 15 Nov 1678; m., DANIEL EMERY.
2. vii. LEMUEL GOWEN, (William¹), shopkeeper, b. 9 Feb 1680; m., SARAH MOUNTFORT.
2. viii. SARAH GOWEN, (William¹), b 30 Mar 1684; m., WILLIAM SMITH.

Second Generation

2. NICHOLAS² GOWEN, (William¹), (Indian scout, attorney, surveyor, farmer), was born at Kittery in 1667. He married, ABIGAIL HODSON.

Biographical Notes:
Nicholas led a very adventurous and stimulating life! He was an Indian scout, attorney, surveyor, and farmer. He was admitted to the York County, Maine bar in April 1703. He left a will. SEE: Legislators of Massachusetts General Court, 1691-1780 (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), (Orig. Pub. by Northeastern University Press , Boston, MA. John A. Schutz, Legislators of the Massachusetts General Court 1691–1780 A Biographical Dictionary, 1997.) Bibliography 1904 Hodsdon g 28; OE 2:55 ff, “Born in Kittery in 1667. Kittery, Me. HR 1701, 09, 10; M Abigail Hodsdon (1664-a1747) in c1694, 9 ch; Indian scout, attorney, surveyor, farmer; will. Admitted to bar in 1703.”

Children of Nicholas and Abigail (Hodson) Gowen: (Nine Children)
3. i. ABIGAIL³ GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹), b. 12 April 1695; m. on 14 Feb 1712/3, MILES THOMPSON.
4. MIRIAM THOMPSON, (Abigail³, Nicholas², William¹), m., JOHN BRACKETT.
3. ii. ELIZABETH GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹), b. at Kittery, 5 July 1697; m. 8 Dec 1718, JOSEPH HART.
3. iii. MARGARET GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹), b. at Kittery, 19 Mar 1699; m. 10 Apr 1717, ABRAHAM LORD.
3. iv. HESTER GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹), b.at Kittery, 20 Nov 1701; m. on 19 Feb 1726/7, HUGH ROSS.
3. v. NICHOLAS GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹), b.at Kittery, 12 Nov 1703
3. vi. WILLIAM GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹),at Kittery, 4 Apr 1705; d. 1748; m. 26 Jun 1724, JANE GOWEN.
3. vii. PATRICK GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹),at Kittery, 30 March 1707; m., MIRIAM SHACKLEY.

3. viii. ANNE³ “ANNA” GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹), b.at Kittery, 29 June 1709; m.9 Dec 1724, RICHARD THURLOW/THURLO.
4. JAMES D. THURLOW, (Anna³, Nicholas², William¹), m. , JUDITH CREDIFORD.
5. DAVIS THURLOW, m., ABIGAIL MANCHESTER.

3. ix. JAMES³ GOWEN, (Nicholas², William¹), (Esquire and Captain), was born at Kittery on 14 Feb 1715. He married, first, on 29 Nov 1738, ANNA SMITH. He married, second, LOIS WOODBRIDGE. He had SEVEN daughters.
4. i. ABIGAIL GOWEN, (James³, Nicholas², William¹)

2. ii. JOHN² GOWEN, (William¹), (selectman), was born at Kittery about 1668-1670 and died at Kittery on 9 Jan 1733. He married at Kittery on 3 Oct 1693, MERCY HAMMOND, the daughter of JOSEPH HAMMOND and CATHERINE FROST. [OE]

Children of John and Mercy (Hammond) Gowen: (Nine Children)

2. iii. WILLIAM² GOWEN, (William¹), was born about 1672 and was killed, by Indians, on 12 Oct 1691.

2. iv. ELIZABETH² GOWEN, (William¹), was born at Kittery about 1673. She married at Kittery on 11 Feb 1694, ALEXANDER FERGUSON.

Children of Alexander and Elizabeth (Gowen) Ferguson: (Seven Children)

2. v. JAMES² GOWEN, (William¹), (blacksmith), was born at Kittery on 29 March 1675. He married at Kittery by 1701, MARY WHEELWRIGHT.

Biographical Notes:
He moved to Wells.

2. vi. MARGARET² GOWEN, (William¹), was born at Kittery on 15 Nov 1678/9 and died on 21 Nov 1751. She married at Kittery on 17 March 1695, DANIEL EMERY.

Children of Daniel and Margaret (Gowen) Emery: (Ten Children?)
3. i. DANIEL³ EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 25 Jun 1697
3. ii. NOAH EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 11 Dec 1699
3. iii. SIMON EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 6 Jan 1702; m., MARTHA LORD.
3. iv. ZECHARIAH EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 12 Mar 1703/4
3. v. MARGARET EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 3 Mar 1706
3. vi. CALEB EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 17 Oct 1710
3. vii. ANNA EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 19 Mar 1712/3
3. viii. JOSHUA EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), b. at Kittery on 30 Jun 1715
3. ix. TIRZAH EMERY, (Margaret², William¹), daughter, b. at Kittery on 19 Sep 1717

2. vii. LEMUEL² GOWEN, (William¹), (shopkeeper), was born at Kittery on 9 Feb 1680. He married, SARAH MOUNTFORT.

Biographical Notes:
Moved to Boston by 1715. Built a brick block on King State Street.

2. viii. SARAH GOWEN, (William¹), was born at Kittery on 30 Mar 1684. She married in 1698, WILLIAM SMITH, of Berwick.

SOURCES and NOTES:
From Heidi Thibodeau on 8 Oct 2016:
“Following is my line to SPOW William Gowen:
William Gowen
Margaret Gowen m. Daniel Emery
Simon Emery m. Martha Lord
Martha Emery m. Ebenezer Lord
Noah Lord m. Keziah Brackett
Keziah Lord m. Benjamin Lord
Noah Bracket(t) Lord m. Anna Morley
Mary Anna Lord m. Albert William Hodgdon
Ella Frances Hodgdon m. Benjamin Nichols Tibbetts
Frances Elna Tibbetts was my grandmother.
~ Heidi –

________________________________________________________
Scots at Oyster River
William Gowen (abt. 1634 – 1686)
B. Craig Stinson – 15 August 2016

Born about 1634, William Gowen may have been one of the younger prisoners of war. Like other of the Unity Scots, he relocated to Kittery, Maine, soon after completing his indenture at Oyster River. The English often called him “Smith.” While “Gowan” means “smith”, William Gowen was a carpenter by trade. He died at about the age of 52, leaving eight grown children to carry on his name.

William Gowen, aka William Smith, William Gowin, Elexander Gowing
#38 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

born about 1634 (about age 51 in 1685) [GDMNH 280]
“Gowan” means a “smith” but William Gowen was a carpenter [OKAHF 468]
1659 – taxed as William Smith at Oyster River [HTDNH 79]
30 June 1659 – convicted of “frequenting the taverns and being in a Quarrell with [fellow Scot] James Middleton.”
11 November 1659 – was on James Murray’s jury of inquest as “William Smith”. Murray was killed by a tree limb that fell on him.
27 June 1660 – was on Thomas Canyda’s jury of inquest. Canyda was found dead, crushed by a large tree.
1661 – “Elexander Gowing” taxed Oyster River [HTDNH 79]
1666 – first appeared at Kittery, now Eliot [HTDNH 79]
14 May 1667 – married Elizabeth Frost, sister of Major Charles Frost [HTDNH 79]
30 June 1668 – William Smith alias Gowin fined “for fighting and bloodshed on ye Lord’s day after ye afternoone meeting”

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 4.00.14 PM 2

New Hampshire Court Records, p. 242
1670 – granted a house lot [HTDNH 79]
1674 – constable [GDMNH 280]
1676 – bought land from James Middleton on the Kennebec River, including Small Point [GDMNH 280]
1679 – was in court for idling away time and drinking [GDMNH 280]
1684 – was sued by Peter White over land ownership [GDMNH 280]
2 Apr 1686 – William Gowen died; will administered 21 May 1686 [GDMNH 280]
8 children

Sources:
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, p. 79.
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, p. 280.
OKAHF Old Kittery and Her Families, Everett S. Stackpole, Lewiston, Maine, Press of the Lewiston Journal Company, 1903, p. 468.
New Hampshire Court Records 1640-1692, vol. 40, Ed. Otis G. Hammond, The State of New Hampshire, 1943, pp. 139, 242, 465, 469.

B. Craig Stinson
August 15, 2016
_________________________________________________

Old Eliot: A Monthly Magazine of the History and Biography of the Upper Parish of Kittery, now Eliot (Eliot, Maine: Augustin Caldwell, 1897) Search for: Gowen and Gowan

From: from Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contirbuted by Vickie Everhart
From: from Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Vickie Everhart.
Opt
Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. Optimized 17 May 2016

Nicholas Gowen:
Legislators of Massachusetts General Court, 1691-1780 (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), (Orig. Pub. by Northeastern University Press , Boston, MA. John A. Schutz, Legislators of the Massachusetts General Court 1691–1780 A Biographical Dictionary, 1997.) Bibliography 1904 Hodsdon g 28; OE 2:55 ff, “Born in Kittery in 1667. Kittery, Me. HR 1701, 09, 10; M Abigail Hodsdon (1664-a1747) in c1694, 9 ch; Indian scout, attorney, surveyor, farmer; will. Admitted to bar in 1703.”

Be Not Forgot – 1667: Marriage of Elizabeth Frost and William Gowen.
“My 9th great-grandpa is William Gowen (alias Smith) . . . who married Elizabeth Frost . . .and they had a son, Nicholas Gowen, who married Abigail Hodsdon . . .and they had a daughter, Abigail Gowen, who married Miles Thompson . . .and they had a daughter, Miriam Thompson, who married John Brackett . . .etc. . . .” ~ Vickie Everhart
~
~benotforgot.com
~facebook.com/benotforgot
~twitter.com/benotforgot

Submitted by Granville Wayne Mitchell:
“My family line from William is 12 generations inclusive. That might be
a bit long, but you can use it if it fits. Or just let it trail off,
the way Jackie did.:
“William Gowen m. Elizabeth Frost
Nicholas Gowen m. Abigail Hodsdon
Anna Gowen m. Richard Thurlow
James D. Thurlow m. Judith Crediford
Davis Thurlow m. Abigail Manchester
Richard Thurlow m. Eunice Tripp
Moses Thurlow m. Alice “Elsie” Strout
John W. Thurlow m. Dorcas Verrill
Frances Thurlow m. George E. Benson
Mabel Benson m. Frederick E. Mitchell,…etc…”
Alternatively, you could mention that I have a large public tree on
Ancestry.com: “Mitchell/Small/Benson/Dustin under the ID
“gwmitchell104″.”

Magoon, Henry

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland on 03 Sep 1650
Ship/Arrival:Unity; Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:Henry Magoon; George S. Stewart’s list
Name Variations:Magoon, Magoun, Magoune, McGowan?, McGoon
Residences:Dover, New Hampshire
Other SPOW Associations:Ed Patterson and James Grant
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 05 Dec 2014
Updated: 204 Mar 2020
Researchers: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust
Editors: Teresa Rust


Henry Magoon, #49 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” List


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 250, Henry is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Magoon/Magoun/[McGowan?], Henry. Residences: Exeter, ME. Dover NH. Appears: 1656. D.1684. Worked for Nicolas Lissen. [Exiles; DR; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.

SPOW DNA Study: Group 1-B, Haplogroups R-Z343, R-M269, R-U106, R-CTS417

Scottish Surname:
Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948. The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin Meaning and History, (New York : New York Public Library & Readex Books, 1962), First published in 1946. Page 505.: MacGowan, MacGoun, MacGown, MacGoune in Scotland.


First Generation in the New World

1. HENRY¹ MAGOON, was born in Scotland about 1625 and died in New Hampshire between 25 Aug 1684 and 1701. He married, first, at Dover, New Hampshire before 21 Oct 1658, ELIZABETH LISSEN, the daughter of NICHOLAS LISSEN. He married, second, between 1 Aug 1677 and 19 Nov 1681, AGNES (MOODY) KENNISTON, wife of John Kenniston.

Biographical Notes:
“Henrey Magoune” was living in Cochechae, New Hampshire in the Dover Town Records by 17 May 1657, along with fellow Scotsmen, Ed Patterson and James Grant.1

CHILDREN of HENRY and ELIZABETH (LISSEN) MAGOON:
2. i. JOHN² MAGOON, b. at Exeter, New Hampshire on 21 Oct 1658, d. abt 1710
2. ii. ALEXANDER² MAGOON, b. 6 Sep 1661, d. bef. 15 Sep 1731
2. iii. MARY² MAGOON, b. 9 Aug 1666, d. abt 1692
2. iv. ELIZABETH² MAGOON, b. 29 Sep 1670, d. unk

Second Generation

2. i. JOHN² MAGOON, (Henry¹), was born at Exeter, NH on 21 Oct 16582 and died about 1710. He married at Exeter by 1701/1706, MARTHA ASH.

CHILDREN of JOHN and MARTHA (ASH) MAGOON:

2. ii. ALEXANDER² MAGOON, (Henry¹), was born on 6 Sep 1661 and died before 15 Sep 1731. He married, in New Hampshire on 7 Dec 1682, SARAH BLAKE.

2. iii. MARY² MAGOON, (Henry¹), was born at Exeter, NH on 9 Aug 1666 and died about 1692. She married at Dover, NH on 6 Sep 1686, JONATHAN CLARK. (New Hampshire: Births to 1901, Deaths and Marriages to 1937. (From microfilmed records. Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014.)

2. iv. ELIZABETH² MAGOON, (Henry¹), was born at Exeter on 29 Sep 1670 and died at Exeter on 14 Jun3 1675. Died young.

Third Generation

3. JOHN MAGOON, m., HANNAH CLATTERDAY.

4. HANNAH MAGOON, b. at Exeter in 1749; m. at Exeter in 1773, JOSEPH GILMAN. SEE: A Puritan Family’s Journey…page 138.


The Magoon Family by Leonard Ellinwood, c1960, Washington, DC. Shared by Jana Paterson Magoon

SOURCES AND NOTES:

Bill Clark shared: “According to my genealogy research, John Clark had a son and a daughter that married children of other Scottish POW:
JONATHAN CLARK was born in 1661. He married Mary MAGOON, daughter of Henry MAGOON and Elizabeth LISSON on 06 Sep 1686 in Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire. She was born on 09 Aug 1666 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire.
SARAH CLARK was born on 14 Dec 1668 in Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts. She died in 1711 in Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire. She married Ingram “Clement” MOODY, son of Ingraham MOODY about 1701 in USA. He was born in 1661 in Essex, Massachusetts.”

Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.
Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.

Battles, Carolyn St John Elliott and James Bruce Battles. A Puritan Family’s Journey:From Hingham to Hingham and onto Sanbornton, New Hampshire The Ancestors of Marion Gilman Elliott. (Lulu.com, Dec 30, 2013) – Biography & Autobiography – 402 pages A Google Book.

Electric Scotland – Henry Magoon (MacGoone)

(see Exeter History Minute)

Susan Buckingham says:
February 25, 2016 at 3:13 am
I am a 9th great granddaughter of Henry Magoon. I understand that Magoon was probably McGowan (from the Gow clan meaning Smith). I also know that Henry’s brother John was on the ship to America with him, but I wondered what happened to his brother William. There is a passenger on that ship names William McGowan (#38 – alias Smith)…perhaps he was their brother. …just wondering.
HENRY MAGOON, was born in Scotland about 1635 Scotland; m. (1) Elizabeth LISSEN (Listen, Lisson), b. abt 1637 and d. 14 Jun 1675, daughter of Nicholas LISSEN bef. 8 Oct 1661 m. (2) Agnes MOODY bet. 1 Aug 1677 & 19 Nov 1681. He d. bet. 25 Aug. 1684 – 1701. Henry had land in both Dover and Exeter N.H. , Henry was credited military service in 1677 for service during King Phillip’s war. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children:
John, b. 21 Oct 1658, d. abt 1710
Alexander, b. 6 Sep 1661, d. bef. 15 Sep 1731
Mary, b. 9 Aug 1666, d. abt 1692
Elizabeth, b. 29 Sep 1670, d. unk
Notes:
Henry is believed to have come to America as an indentured servant after being captured at the Battle of Dunbar, Scotland on 3 September 1650 by Oliver Cromwell during the English Civil War. He is listed as one of 150 men consigned for New England aboard the ship Unity. His indenture was purchased by Nicholas Lissen and Henry eventually married his second daughter Elizabeth. Henry’s burial place is unknown and he probably lived in an area where most of the Scots lived in west Exeter an area called Pick Pocket woods near the Lissen mill, which may have been located near the falls on the Squamscott River. This distance from the center of town allowed the Scots some freedom from the religious convictions of the day.

Submitted by: Scott Magoon on 25 Oct 2013:
Henry Magoon[1] , was born about 1635 in Scotland. He married first, Elizabeth Lissen (Listen/Lisson), the daughter of Nicholas Lissen[2], before 8 Oct 1661[3]. Elizabeth was born about 1637 and died14 Jun 1675. Henry married second, Agnes Moody sometime before 1 Aug 1677 and 19 Nov 1681. Henry died[4] between 25 Aug 1684 – 1701[5]. Henry had land in both Dover and Exeter New Hampshire[6]. He was credited for military service in 1677, for service during King Phillip’s War.[8]
Children of Henry Magoon and Elizabeth Lissen:[9]
John, born 21 Oct 1658 and died about 1710
Alexander, born 6 Sep 1661 and died before 15 Sep 1731
Mary, born 9 Aug 1666 and died about 1692
Elizabeth, born 29 Sep 1670 and died unknown

Notes:
Henry is believed to have come to America as an indentured servant after being captured at the Battle of Dunbar, Scotland on 3 September 1650 by Oliver Cromwell during the English Civil War. On 10 Sept 1650 the Council of State directed “To write Sir Arth. Hesilrigge that Council have referred the disposing of the prisoners to a committee, from which he will speedily receive some order; and that it is left to him to dispose of so many as he conceives he may to the work of the coal mines.”[10] The Council of State on 19 Sep 1650 directed “To write Sir Arthur Hesilrigge to deliver to Samuel Clarke, for transportation to Virginia, 900 Scotch prisoners, and 150 men for New England, to be sent there by Joshua Foot and John Bex, but they are to be such as are well and sound, and are free from wounds; letters to be prepared to Sir Arthur Hesilrigge according to such desires as shall be made by any who will carry them to plantations not in enmity with the commonwealth.”[11] On 23 Oct 1650 the Council of State stated “The Admiralty Committee to examine whether the Scotch prisoners now come and coming into the river are carried to places where they may be made use of against the commonwealth, and stay to be made of all, until assurance be given of their not being carried where they may be dangerous; the proportion for New England to be shipped away forewith, as their ship is ready, and the place is without danger.”[12] On 11 Nov. 1650 the Council of State, “To write Sir Arthur Hesilrigge to deliver 150 Scotch Prisoners to Augustine Walker, master of the Unity, to be transported to New England.”[13] He is listed as one of 150 men consigned for New England aboard the ship Unity. [14] On 3 Feb 1652 “Ordered, that the Council of State do take into Consideration, what prisoners of the Scottish Nation have been taken during these Wars, either in England or Scotland; and to make an exact List of them, and how they have been disposed of, and where they now are; and report the same to Parliament with all Speed: And likewise that the Council do take Order, that a fit Provision and Relief be given to such of them as are in Prison, and in Necessity, according to the Rules formerly given.”[15] His indenture was purchased by Nicholas Lissen and Henry eventually married his second daughter Elizabeth. [16] Henry’s burial place is unknown and he probably lived in an area where most of the Scots lived in west Exeter an area called Pick Pocket woods near the Lissen mill, which may have been located near the falls on the Squamscott River. This distance from the center of town allowed the Scots some freedom from the religious convictions of the day[17].

Footnotes:

[1] Henry, Exeter, a Scot, had a Dover gr. in 1656, taxed there 1657-8. In Oct. 1661 he bot from Thos. King the land in Ex. on which his ho. already stood, and the same day had land from his fa.-in-law with remainder to his s. John, then to his 2d son. He d. betw. 25 Aug. 1684-1701. Lists 356abc, 376b(1664), 380, 381, 383, 52, (****94). His 1st w. Elizabeth (Lisson 2), d. 14 June 1675 and he appar. m. 2d betw. 1 Aug. 1677–19 Nov. 1681 Agnes, wid. of John Kenniston(5). Ch. rec. Exeter: John, b. 21 Oct. 1658. Alexander, b. 6 Sept. 1661. Mary, b. 9 Aug. 1666, m. Jonathan Clark(26). Elizabeth, b. 29 Sept. 1670. (GDMNH, p. 452)

[2] Lissen,Listen. Liston a par. in Essex. Nicholas (aut.),millman, Exeter, ±60 in 1678, ±80 in 1694. Salem and Marbleh. 1637; of Glouc. 10 Oct. 1648 bot Geo. Barlow’s two houses and lands in Ex.; town gr. 12 Jan. 1648-9, the first of many, incl. mill privileges. One of three to collect town rent for sawmills 1653; Selectm. 1654-56, 1662, 1666; Commit. on Dover-Ex. bounds 1671-2. He bot ho. and land at the waterside 1654, int. in various new sawmills, and in May 1667 from Robt. Wadleigh half his 320 a. on Lamprill Riv., from which both had been disposs. and Mr. Saml. Symonds put in, bef. 30 Oct. 1668. For litigation in which Wadleigh held on, he didn’t, see Dover Hist. Memo. pp. 402-4. Lists 376b, 379, 380, 377, 383, 52. Two wives in sight once each, Alice 1666, Jane m. in Ex. 14 Dec. 1682. He spent his last yrs. with Nich. and Mary (Gordon) Smith; and d. when their s. Richard was 8 or 9 yrs. old. Called decd. in deed 20 May 1697. Adm. 8 Dec. 1714 to gr. sons Alex. Magoon and Nich. Gordon; late div. to three daus. or repres.: Hannah, eldest, m. John Bean (2). Elizabeth, 2d dau., m. by 1661 Henry Magoon. Mary, 3d dau., m. Alexander Gordon(1).

[3] [Henry & 1/wf Elizabeth LESSEN (-1675); by 8 Oct 1661; Dover, NH/Exeter, NH {Essex Ant. 3:43-4, 5:15, 10:78, 11:23; Magoun Supp. 2; GDMNH 436, 452}, (NE marriage prior to 1700, p. 484)

[4] MAGOON, Henry & 2/wf Agnes (_____) KENNISTON, w John; betw 1 Aug 1677 & 19 Nov 1681 (NE marriage prior to 1700, p. 483)

[5] See note 1

[6] Thomas KIng of Exeter for 3 (pounds) and 6 days work, conveyed to Henry Magoone of Exeter 2 1/2 acres of upland upon which his dwelling-house standeth, being formally of Willi: Whitred of Ipswich and before of Nichlas Lissen, Oct 7, 1661 (The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 3, pgs. 43-44)

[7] “The river lots, from St. Alban’s cove to Quamphegan, were granted in 1656, and ranged as follows: … Henry Magoun…. (History of Dover N.H., p. 179).

[8] Later Credits for Military Service, Exeter, October 24, 1676, Henry Magoon, 00 [pounds] 01 [shillings] 08 [d] (Soldiers of King Phillip’s War, pgs 448-9)

[9] Exeter, Vital Records, Vol. 1, 1657-1848, Microfilm roll #99, pg. 5

[10] Great Britain Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series 1650, Vol. XI, p. 334; available on Google Books

[11] Great Britain Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series 1650, Vol. XI, p. 346; available on Google Books

[12] Great Britain Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series 1650, Vol. XI, p. 397; available on Google Books

[13] Great Britain Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series 1650, Vol. XI, p. 423; available on Google Books

[14] Elizabeth French Papers, Bartlett Collection, R. Stanton Avery Special Collection NEHGS, Boston

[15] House of Commons Journal, Vol. 7 (1651-1660), 3 Feb 1653, pub. 1802, p. 253-4

[16] See note 2

[17] Barbara Rimkunas Exeter N.H. Historical Society unpublished email correspondence

  1. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21068/248/45649272 []
  2. New Hampshire: Births, Deaths and Marriages, 1654-1969. (From microfilmed records. Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB516/rd/13805/822/246286108 []

Thompson, William

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 04 Dec 2014, Updated: 4 Apr 2019
Page contributors: Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


William Thompson, #105 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list1
Surname variations: Thompson (common in England), Thomson (common in Scotland)


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (Jul 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018),2 on page 252, William is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Thompson/Thomson/Tompson/Tomson, William. Residences: Dover NH, Kittery ME. Appears: 1656. D.1676. Granted land at the same time as Scots who worked at the Great Works. However, a Thompson family was already living in the area, so he may not be a Scot. [Exiles; Banks; DR; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]345167

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. WILLIAM¹ THOMPSON, was born, presumably in Scotland about 1635 and died at Kittery, York, Maine in 1676. He married at Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire, in 1658, UNKNOWN WHITE, daughter of JOHN WHITE.

Biographical Notes:
In Charles Edward Banks Scotch Prisoners Deported to New England by Cromwell, 1651-1652, William is listed as being from the Battle of Dunbar and working at the Great Works Saw Mill managed by Richard Leader, who fled to Barbados in 1656 after getting into a bit of trouble with ruling politics between Maine and Massachusetts. He left the SPOWs destitute and it is unclear if he set them free at that time. However, grants of land for these men began appearing in court records at that time.
A few years after 1650 – William Thompson is in the town of South Berwick…SEE: Clayton, W. Woodford. The History of York County, Maine (Philadelphia: Philadelphia, Everts & Peck, 1880) page 315:

William Thompson was a farmer by trade at the time of the birth of his son John. There does seem to be a lot of confusing information on William Thompson on the Internet. More documentation is needed!

Children of William and Unknown (White) Thompson:
2. i. JOHN² THOMPSON, born at Dover, New Hampshire about 1657*.
2. ii. WILLIAM² THOMPSON, born at Dover about 1661
2. iii. ROBERT² THOMPSON, born at Kittery about 1664
2. iv. JAMES² THOMPSON, born at Kittery about 1666
2. v. ALEXANDER² THOMPSON, born at Kittery about 1671
2. vi. JUDITH² THOMPSON, born at Kittery about 1675

Second Generation

2. i. JOHN² THOMPSON (William¹), born at Dover, New Hampshire about 1657. He married, SARAH WOODMAN.

Biographical Notes:
John Thompson was a carpenter by trade at the birth of his son, John.

Children of John and Sarah (Woodman) Thompson:
3. i. JOHN³ THOMPSON, (John², William¹), born at Oyster River, Durham, New Hampshire before 1680.

2. ii. WILLIAM² THOMPSON (William¹)
2. iii. ROBERT² THOMPSON (William¹)
2. iv. JAMES² THOMPSON (William¹)
2. v. ALEXANDER² THOMPSON (William¹) born at Kittery, York, Maine about 1671.

Children of Alexander and Unknown (_____) Thompson:
3. SAMUEL³ THOMPSON

2. vi. JUDITH² THOMPSON (William¹)


Scotch Prisoners deported to New England by Cromwell, 1651-1652 (Banks 1927) Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 61, 4-30. Available on JSTOR.


The History of York County, Maine, c1880. Page 315.
The History of York County, Maine, c1880. Page 315.


Torrey's New England Marriages to 1700 (3)
Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. Page 1511.


Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948. The Surnames of Scotland, Their Origin Meaning and History, (New York : New York Public Library & Readex Books, 1962), First published in 1946. Page 769.:
Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 5.29.54 PM 2Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 5.30.12 PM


SPOW DNA Study:
Group 1-B, Haplogroup R-Z288


SOURCES and NOTES:

26 Nov 2016, Sandra Burke wrote, I am a descendant of William Thompson’ son James.
James Thompson 1666
James Thompson 1707-1791
Elizabeth Thompson Weed 1733-1766
Lydia Weed Welch 1758-1805
Ezekiel Welch 1794-1863
Julia Welch Godfrey 1819-1877
Frederick Godfrey 1859-1939
Cecil Godfrey 1903-1987
Annette Godfrey Dugans 1930-2010″
~ Sandra

“He married, “about 1678″, Sarah Woodman. Both were of Oyster River at the time, which was then a part of Dover and is now Durham, NH.” ~ Wayne, 7th great-grandson of William Thompson

“Just a small correction to William Thompson’s page: His wife was certainly a daughter of John White, but her given name is unknown. It could not have been Mary, because John White’s daughter Mary was unmarried in 1665 when she bore an illegitimate child. Source: Noyes, et al., /Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire/.” ~ Wayne Mitchell

New Hampshire- Births to 1901, Deaths and Marriages to 1937

Jackie Thompson wrote and submitted the following:
William Thompson is #105 on the George S. Stewart list for “The Dunbar Prisoners.”

In Charles Edward Banks Scotch Prisoners Deported to New England by Cromwell, 1651-1652, William is listed as being from the Battle of Dunbar and working at the Great Works Saw Mill managed by Richard Leader, who fled to Barbados in 1656 after getting into a bit of trouble with ruling politics between Maine and Massachusetts. He left the SPOWs destitute and it is unclear if he set them free at that time. However, grants of land for these men began appearing in court records at that time.

1656 – William received a grant of land in Dover, NH. This was laid out, March 17, 1658/1659 “beyond Cocheco Logg Swamp.” On November 8, 1715 William’s son John Thompson, Sr. of Dover, conveyed to John Tuttle fifty acres of land which “were granted to my father, William Thompson, by the town of Dover.” It lay beyond Cocheco Log Swamp, “bounded on the south by Bellamy Bank River.” There is no evidence that William Thompson ever lived on this grant.

October 15, 1656 – Kittery Records – 23 acres were assigned to “William Thompson and his heirs forever at a town meeting in Kittery, Maine by John White” (William’s future father in law). It was located a short way below Sturgeon Creek.

1658 – William married a daughter of John White – Mary Elizabeth White (born 1639 in Kittery, Maine).

1659 – William Thompson was presented at York Court “for rebellion against his father and mother-in-law” He bound himself to the court in a bond of 20 Pounds “that hee will be of good behavior towards all men, especially towards his father and mother.” (State copy of Court Records, Vol. I page 331.)

1676 – William died at Kittery, York, Maine and his estate was appraised, June 22 of that year, at 52 Pounds and 18 Shillings. He left twenty-three acres of land, a house and orchard at Kittery, Maine, and fifty acres in Dover, NH, which he gave to his sons. His wife had died before 1676. He left children, whose ages were given in 1677 as follows:
i. JOHN THOMPSON, aged 18 (Born 1658)
ii. WILLIAM THOMPSON, aged 16 (Born 1661)
iii. ROBERT THOMPSON, aged 13 (Born 1664)
iv. JAMES THOMPSON, aged 11 (Born 1666)
v. ALEXANDER THOMPSON, aged 6 (Born 1671)
vi. JUDITH THOMPSON, aged 2 (Born 1675)

I am descended from Alexander Thompson. – Jackie


For additional help, please go to the Facebook Group.
(Our small website team is unable to help with further research.)



  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ [] []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 252. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Banks, C.E. 1927. ‘Scotch Prisoners deported to New England by Cromwell 1651-2’. Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 61, 4-30. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25080212 []
  5. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  6. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  7. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Ch. 7, 8. []

Grant, James (2)

Battle:3 Sep 1650, Battle of Dunbar, at Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity; Dec 1650, MA Bay Colony
Prisoner and List:
James Grant/Graunt (2), #34 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list
Name Variations:Grant, Graunt,
Residences:Kittery, York County, Maine
Other SPOW Associations:Peter Grant
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 03 Dec 2016, Updated: 5 Sep 2020
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust
Editor: Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 249, James is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Grant/Graunt, James (2) ‘the Scotchman’. Residences: York, ME. Appears: 1660. D.1663. Associated with Peter Grant. Indicted for not returning home to his wife in Scotland. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Find his descendants and researchers here.

First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ GRANT (2), “the Scotchman,” died 1663. He married at York County, Maine about 1660, JOAN/[JOANNA] (_____). (She later married Peter Grant in 1664.)

Biographical Notes:
“James Grant signed a petition from York in 1660. He and Peter Grant were presented at court in 1661 for not going home to their wives.” See more: Stackpole, Everett S., Old Kittery and Her Families. (Kittery, Maine: Press of Lewiston journal Company, 1903), page 471.

Children of James and Joan/Joanna (_____) Grant:
2. ELIZABETH GRANT, born probably at Kittery between 1658 and 1663. She married, WILLIAM EARL, Sr., of Berwick.

Sources and Notes:
A founding member of the Scots Charitable Society on 6 Jan 1657 [OS].
SOURCE: Scots Charitable Society, ed., The Constitution and By-laws, of the Scots Charitable Society of Boston, (Boston: Farrington Printing Co., 1896), 10.

On 24 Jul 2013 Paula Sieple, wrote, “The Unity” James Grant, locally known in Maine as “The Scotchman”, was in Maine with Peter Grant (from “The Unity” and Lynn Iron Works). James, married to someone named Joan and with a daughter Elizabeth, died in 1663 in Maine Peter Grant married the widow Joan 28 Nov 1664 in Old Kittery, Maine. Peter is my 7x maternal great grandfather. James, Peter, and Alexander Grant were founding members of the Scots Charitable Society of Boston in 1657. Reference OLD KITTERY AND HER FAMILIES, Everett Stackpole Pg. 471ff: “James Grant is said in an old manuscript to have been ‘taken in arms for Charles I’ and to have been banished by Cromwell. He is called in old records The Scotchman.”

Agnew, Niven

Battle:3 Sep 1650, Battle of Dunbar, at Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity; Dec 1650, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Prisoner and List:Niven Agnew, #2 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list
Name Variations:Nyven Agnew, Niven Agneau, “Nivin the Scot”
Residences:Dover, New Hampshire and Kittery, Maine
Other SPOW Associations:John/James Barry, Peter Grant, John Taylor
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 02 December 2014
Updated: 05 Sep 2020
Researchers: Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, and B. Craig Stinson
Editor: Teresa Rust


Contributed by Dr. Andrew Millard in July 2018:
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 248, Niven is categorized as: Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Agnew/Agneau, Niven/Nyven/Nivin. Residences: Dover NH, Kittery ME. Appears: 1659. D.1687. Childless. Left Left bequests to the daughter of Peter Grant and the daughter of John Taylor. [Exiles; Banks; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8; App.B] For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. NIVEN¹ AGNEW, was born, presumably in Scotland and died at Kittery, Maine in 1687. He married, MRS. (_____) BARRY, the widow of, JOHN [JAMES] BARRY, a fellow Scot. Died childless.

Biographical Notes:
Read the report below by B. Craig Stinson:

From: B. Craig Stinson:

“After earning his freedom in 1659, Niven Agnew (Niven the Scot) (Unity prisoner #2 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list) moved upriver to Salmon Falls, where he worked at one of John Wincoll’s mills. Wincoll may have had financial troubles; in 1671 Agnew sued him for back pay amounting to the large sum of £40. His friend and fellow Scot John Barry was killed in the Indian attack of 1675; Agnew administered the estate and not only took possession of Barry’s farm below the Great Works, he also married John Barry’s widow. When Agnew died childless about 1687, his will granted all of his property to two daughters of Scottish neighbors John Taylor and Peter Grant.”

1659: Dover Tax List
1676: Managed estate in South Berwick, Maine
1687:
16 Sep – Agnew’s Will
Maine Probate

“Kittery, Maine – Probate 16 Sep 1687,” Dobson, David. Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785, (Athens: Georgia University Press, 1994; paperback version 2004), 36.

“A study of these Scotchmen clears up a lot of mystery heretofore connected with certain names that appear in early tax lists of Dover and in court records. Let us see who they were. Nyven Agnew, called also Niven Agneau, is called “Nivin the Scot” in the Dover tax-list of 1659, shortly after he got his freedom. He administered the estate of James Barry, another Scotchman of South Berwick, Maine, about 1676, and lived on the land that Kittery had granted to Barry. Agnew’s will, 16 September 1687, mentions debts due to him from James Barry, his predecessor. He divides his property between Peter Grant and John Taylor, two other Scotchmen. In the inventory of his estate is this item, “To a sword that Peter Grant did say he would give ten shillings for.” Neither Barry nor Agnew married.” FROM: History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, (Oyster River Plantation), by Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, Published by vote of the Town, ©1913; pgs 75-83 from the Chapter “Exiles from Scotland”

Nyven Agnew, also called Nivin Agneau, is called “Nivin the Scot” in the Dover tax-list of 1659, shortly after he got his freedom. He administered the estate of James Barry, another Scotchman of South Berwick, Me., about 1676, and lived on the land that Kittery had granted to Barry. Agnew’s will, 16 September 1687, mentions debts due him from James Barry, his predecessor. He divides his property between Peter Grant and John Taylor, two other Scotchmen. In the inventory of his estate is this item, “To a sword that Peter Grant did say he would give ten shillings for.” Neither Barry nor Agnew married. Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) (Published by vote of the Town, 1913), 1:76.

July 1, 1703, John Key senior, aged about 70 years, deposed that James Barry, Niven Agnue and John Taylor owned in succession a farm in upper Kittery, now South Berwick. Stackpole, History of the Town of Durham, 1:81.

Probably worked at sawmills in Kittery, Maine, “on the Asbenbedick, now Great Works, River in which Becx and Co. of London had an interest” under Richard Leader, former manager of ironworks. In the same year when Leader left, “grants of land were made to some of them [the Scots exiles] in 1656, indicating that they had been released.” Others in this group included Niven Agnew, Alexander Cooper, William Furbush, Daniel Ferguson, Peter Grant, George Gray, William Gowen, David Hamilton, Thomas Holme, John Key, Alexander Maxwell, John Neal, John Ross, John Taylor, William Thomson, and James Warren.” Charles Banks, “Scotch Prisoners Deported to New England by Cromwell, 1651-1652,” Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 61 (1927): 15.

BARROW, Barry, 1 James, Berwick. He had grants in Kit. 1662, 1673. Lists 25, 298. Wm. Gowen had James Barrow at his house and cured him of scurvy. K. by Ind in. 16 Oct. 1675. Adm. 4 Apr. 1676 to Niven Agnew, who mar. his wid. and liv. on his farm, next north of those shown in Stackp. Kittery, p. 133. No ch. Agnew=s will, calling him >my predecessor,= devised his lands. Sybil Noyes, et al., Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire (Portland, Me.: Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-39), p. 78.

At court in Wells, April 4, 1676: Lyberty granted to Nivine Nignow to Improve James Barrows Land untill the Court take further order, hee allowing for the uss of It such a Consideration as is meete.

At court in Wells, July 4, 1676: Pouer of Administration granted unto Nivine Nignow of the Estate of James Barrow deceased, who is Injoyned to bring in a true Inventory thereof & to bring in security sufficient to respond that estate unto the next Court of Assotiates houlden for this County on the 2und Tusday of September next Insewing. Ibid., 2:315.

See: Diane Rapaport, “Scots for Sale, Part II: Scottish Prisoners in Seventeenth-Century Maine and New Hampshire,” New England Ancestors (Holiday 2004), 27, which discussed James Barry and his close friend, Niven Agnew: One of Agnew’s closest friends, Scotsman James Barry, died during an Indian 5 attack in 1675. Agnew administered the estate, not only taking possession of Barry’s farm below the Great Works, but also marrying his friend’s widow. When Agnew died childless, about 1687, his will granted all of his property to two daughters of Scottish neighbors John Taylor and Peter Grant.

Grant, Peter

Battle:Battle of Dunbar at Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland on 3 Sep 1650
Ship/Arrival:The ketch Unity; late Dec 1650, MA Bay Colony
Prisoner and List:Peter Grant, #11 on the “Scots at Lynn, 1653, Iron Works Inventory”1
Name Variations:
Residences:Oyster River, New Hampshire, Kittery, Maine
Other SPOW Associations:The Scots at the Iron Works Inventory in Lynn, 1653. John Mackey/Key
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 02 Jul 2014, Updated: 7 Mar 2019
Page contributors: Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson, Justin Swanstrom, Rosann Beauvais
Editor: Teresa Rust

First Generation in the New World

1. PETER¹ GRANT, was born in Scotland about 1631 and died at Berwick, York County, Maine about 1712. He married, first, in Scotland, before Sep 1650 [see Sources below], UNKNOWN (_____). He married, second, at Kittery, on 28 Nov 1664, JOHANNA/JOAN (_____) GRANT, widow of, JAMES (2) GRANT, a SPOW. She was born at Salem, Essex Co., Mass. about 1644 and died in Maine about 1710.

Biographical Notes:
1. According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018),2 on page 247, Peter is categorized as: Definite [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Grant, Peter. Residences: Oyster River NH, Kittery ME. Appears: 1653. B.c.1631. D.1712. A founder of the SCS. Indicted for not returning home to his wife in Scotland. Married the widow of James (2) Grant. [Exiles; Banks; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8; App.B]3456178 For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.
2. “James Grant signed a petition from York in 1660. He and Peter Grant were presented at court in 1661 for not going home to their wives.”9
3. “In July 1661 Peter was indicted together with James Grant, almost certainly a relative and perhaps his brother, for ‘not returning home to his wife’; that is the wife he had left behind in Scotland a decade earlier. Dunbar wives back in Scotland were being advised that they should not marry unless they had clear evidence of their husband’s deaths or the sentence of a civil judge. However, in July 1664 Peter was back in court again for living with a young widow named Joane, ‘hee owneing of her as his wife and they being not married’. This was probably his sister-in-law, his brother’s ‘widow’ – James having being declared deceased.”10
4. He was mentioned again later in connection to the mill at Great Works, “About 1665 [Eliakim] Hutchinson rented the mill to Thomas Doughty, and James Grant of York, Peter Grant and John Taylor became Doughty’s bondsmen. The bond was dated 1 June, 1665.”11
5. “The name, Peter Grant, was found in the Bartlett Collection documents on a list compiled by George S. Stewart. The list was labeled “35 Scots at Lynn 1653. Iron Works Invt.” He is also mentioned on the Old Berwick Historical Society website along with other Scottish prisoners of war, see: “The Scottish Prisoners of 1650” at the Old Berwick Historical Society. List of names given as also being Scottish prisoners of war: Niven Agnew, James Barry, Alexander Cooper, Daniel Ferguson, William Furbush, William Gowen, Peter Grant, George Gray, David Hamilton, Thomas Holme, John Key, Alexander Maxwell, John Neal, John Reed, John Ross, John Taylor, William Thomson, and James Warren. Peter’s name also pops up at the Geni.com site “Scots Prisoners and their Relocation to the Colonies, 1650-1654,” where the list of the Iron Works shows up again as well as a mention of a Unity parish in Kittery, Maine, presumably founded by some or all of the 15 Scottish prisoners of war that worked in the sawmills there. On 6 Jan 1657, Peter Grant went on the record books for making a donation to Scots Charitable Society.”
6. DNA Studies:
Scottish POW DNA Study: Group 1-A, Haplogroup R-BY2668
Grant DNA Project: Kit #21340

Children of Peter and Johanna/Joan (_____) Grant:
2. i. JAMES² GRANT+, (Peter¹), b. at Kittery on 23 Mar 1669/70; d. at Berwick before 16 Apr 1742; m. (1) MARY NASON; m. (2) RACHEL STONE.
2. ii. WILLIAM² GRANT, b. at Kittery about 1671; d. at Berwick about 1722; M., 1st, JANE WARREN, daughter of JAMES WARREN (Probable Dunbar Prisoner), m. 2nd, MARTHA NELSON.
2. iii. GRIZELL² GRANT, b. between 1670-1680; m., JOHN KEY.
2. iv. MARY² GRANT, b. at Berwick about 1676; m., JOSEPH PRAY.
2. v. HANNAH² GRANT, b. Bet. 1670 – 1680.
2. vi. PETER² GRANT, b. Bet. 1670 – 1680; m., MARY THOMAS; b. 4.
2. vii. ALEXANDER² GRANT, b. Abt. 1674; d. Aft. 17375.

Second and Third Generations

2. i. JAMES² GRANT (Peter¹), was born at Kittery on 23 March 1669/70 and died at Berwick before 16 April 1742. He married, first, at Kittery on 9 Oct. 1693, MARY NASON, daughter of JONATHAN and SARAH (JENKINS) NASON. He married, second, before 1709, RACHEL STONE, daughter of DANIEL and PATIENCE (GOODWIN) STONE.

Biographical Notes:
Berwick, Me. HR 1718, 25, 27M, 27N, 32; selectman 1713-17, 19, 22-24, 28-35; moderator 1729-34; capt. 1727; M Mary Nason (1672-b1709) in 1693 and Rachel Stone (1680-a1722) in c1709, 6/6 ch; farmer; will. In the 1718 HR, he was primarily interested in pressing a town petition setting its boundaries, probably because of his lumber lands. In later legislatures, he was less active, but he did have four committees in 1727N.12)

Children of James and Mary (Nason) Grant:
3. i. JAMES GRANT, (James², Peter¹), was born on 8 Oct 1694 and died on 15 Feb 1701. Died Young.
3. ii. PETER GRANT, (James², Peter¹), was born on 14 Dec 1696. He married, LYDIA FOST. (FROST?)
3. iii. MARY GRANT, (James², Peter¹), was born on 12 Feb 1699. She married, ANDREW WALKER.
3. iv. SARAH GRANT, (James², Peter¹), was born on 12 Sep 1701. She married, JOSEPH AUSTIN.
3. v. JAMES GRANT, (James², Peter¹), was born on 8 Dec 1703. He married, SARAH JOY.

Children of James and Rachel (Stone) Grant:
3. vi. DANIEL GRANT, (James², Peter¹).
3. vii. ELIAS GRANT, (James², Peter¹), was baptized on 8 Jun 1713. He married, MARGARET GOODWIN, a descendant of John/James Taylor (Definite Dunbar Prisoner, #32 on the Lynn Iron Works Inventory)
3. viii. JOSHUA GRANT, (James², Peter¹), was baptized on 10 Apr 1715.
3. ix. RACHEL GRANT, (James², Peter¹), baptized on 13 Jun 1717.
3. x. ELISHA GRANT, (James², Peter¹), bap. 25 Oct 1719.
3. xi. ELIJAH GRANT, (James², Peter¹), bap. 15 Jul 1722.

2. ii. WILLIAM² GRANT, (Peter¹), was born at Kittery about 1671 and died at Berwick about 1722. He married* (1) at Kittery* on 4 Aug. 1690*, JANE WARREN*, daughter of JAMES WARREN (Probable Dunbar Prisoner) and Margaret (_____). He married* (2) at Kittery* on 26 Dec 1695*, MARTHA NELSON*, the daughter of CHARLES NELSON.

Children of William and Jane (Warren) Grant:
3. i. JANE GRANT, was born at Kittery in 1692.

Children of William and Martha (Nelson) Grant:
3. ii. WILLIAM GRANT, (William², Peter¹), was born at Kittery in 1696. He married ABIGAIL KENNARD.
3. iii. ALEXANDER GRANT, (William², Peter¹), was born at Kittery in 1699.
3. iv. MARY GRANT, (William², Peter¹), was born at Kittery in 1701.
3. v. MARTHA GRANT, (William², Peter¹), was born at Kittery in 1704. She married, EPHRAIM WENTWORTH?.
3. vi. CHARLES GRANT, (William², Peter¹), was born at Kittery in 1719. He married KEZIAH (_____).

2. iii. GRIZELL² GRANT, (Peter¹), was born probably at Kittery, between 1670-1680. She married, JOHN KEY, a descendant of SPOW, JOHN MACKEY/KEY.

2. iv. MARY² GRANT, (Peter¹), was born at Berwick about 1676. She married, JOSEPH PRAY. (Joseph’s sister DOROTHY PRAY married DANIEL FURBUSH, also a SPOW)

Children of Joseph and Mary (Grant) Pray:
3. i. JOHN PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),
3. ii. SAMUEL PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),
3. iii. PETER PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),
3. iv. JOANNA PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),
3. v. MARY PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),
3. vi. MARTHA PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),
3. vii. MIRIAM PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),
3. viii. ELIZABETH PRAY, (Mary², Peter¹),

2. v. HANNAH² GRANT, (Peter¹), was born between 1670 – 1680.

2. vi. PETER² GRANT+, (Peter¹), was born between 1670 – 1680. He married, at Newcastle, New Hampshire, by 1701, MARY THOMAS.

2. vii. ALEXANDER² GRANT, (Peter¹), was born about 1674 and died after 1737.
– END OF GENERATION LIST

Scots at Oyster River, Peter Grant (abt 1631-1712) By B. Craig Stinson
5 August 2016

Screen Shot 2016-08-23 at 9.44.30 AM 2

Peter Grant, was born about 1631. His original indenture was at the Lynn Iron Works, so he was not one of Valentine Hill’s Scots. As a free man in 1661, he was indicted “for not returning home to his wife.” In 1664 he was in court for living as husband and wife with a young widow named Joan Grant. Her husband James Grant had apparently died, and she was “bigg with Child”. Peter, whose first wife was supposed to still be alive (presumably in Scotland), was sentenced to £10 or 10 lashes on the bare skin, and ordered to “mantayne the Child of the sd Joane Grant soe soone as shee is delivered.” After a prescribed period of separation, the couple was allowed to marry. Peter and Joan Grant eventually raised eight children together on their farm along the Newichawannock about two miles upriver from our William Furbish. But although the oldest child, Elizabeth, was probably raised in the household, Peter Grant always insisted that he was not her father, and explicitly did not name Elizabeth in his will. However, Elizabeth was named in the will of childless Niven Agnew, and also in the will of a man named James Grant, who died at Kittery in 1683.

An excellent summary with citations can be found at http://petergrantthescot.com/peter-grant-generation-report/
born about 1631 [GDMNH 282]
Originally at Lynn Iron Works [#11 Iron Works Inventory] [HTDNH 79]
21 Oct 1659 – bought land from James Emery
1659 – taxed at Dover, New Hampshire
2 July 1661 – indicted by a York County (Maine) grand jury “for not returneing home to his wife.”
[2:156] Inquest July 2: 1661 “Wee present Peter Grant a Scotchman for not returneing home to his wife. Wee present James Grant a Scotchman for not returneing home to his wife.”
5 July 1664 – indicted a second time, this time for living with Joan Grant unlawfully as husband and wife:
[2:2-2] Wee present Peter Grant & Joane Grant the wife of James Grant deseased for liveing In one house togeather, hee owneing of her as his wife & they being not married. Witness Richard Abbutt

Whereas Itt appears by Peter Grants acknowledgement of his keepeing Company with Joane Grant In soe familiar manner as If they had been lawfully married which they never were nor Could bee, because the Grants wife is yett alive for any thing that is known to the Contrary, & the sd Joane Grant being now bigg with Child, It is ordered by the Court as followeth:
In reference to Peter Grants presentment for his offence herein shall either pay tenn pounds In to the Treasury or to have tenn lashes given him on the bare skine.

Peter Grant appeales from this sentence to the next Court houlden for this County. Peter Grant & Tho. Doughty do Ingage them salves In a bond of 201i that the sd Grant shall prosecute his appeale to the next County Court & the sd Grant & Doughty do Ingege In a bond of 201i that further Peter Grant shall take meete care to mantayne the Child of the sd Joane Grant soe soone as shee is delivered.

13 Sep 1664 – a remedy is offered:
Att a Court of Assotiats September 13: 1664: Itt is further ordered by this Court, for preventing any further evill betweene the sd Peter and Joane Grant by there frequent unlawfull Comeing together, that hereby theere shall bee and is an Act of seperation made betweene them, after publication whereof it they shall bee at any tyme found frequently or unseasonably togeather, &* that It do Legally appeare, each person shall either forfitt tenn pounds to the County Treasury or bee lyable to such other Censure as the Law in such Cases doth provide.

28 Nov 1664 – Peter Grant and Joan, the widow of James Grant, were married at Kittery. [GDMNH 282] The child the bride was ‘big with’ became Elizabeth. This Elizabeth was made chief heir as “Elizabeth Grant, daughter of Joane wife of Peter Grant” in the 1679 will of James Grant [#2]. Peter Grant’s will named his seven children, “them seven’ – Elizabeth was not listed.

1674 – grant of 120 acres near York Pond [OKAHF 472]
1680 – Peter Grant was fined “for lying drunke in the high way,”
1683 – Peter Grant was trustee Alexander Cooper’s will
1686 – Niven Agnew’s will mentions his sword that Peter Grant had said he would pay 10 shillings for.
1691 – Peter Grant was fined in for profaning the Sabbath, when he and some other Scots killed a deer and frightened their neighbors, who feared that the gunshots signaled an Indian attack. [source: “Scottish Prisoners in Seventeenth-Century Maine and New Hampshire” by Diane Rapaport]
1693 – was a surveyor of highways and fences
19 Oct 1709 – will made; “being aged & Creasey in body but of good Memory Praise be to God for it” [MW 212-213]
abt February 1712-13 – Peter Grant died
2 March 1712-13 – inventory; valued £216: 10: 0.
His land is marked on the map of OKAHF 133.
In the will, wife Johanah receives all movables
Son William receives the 50 acres granted by Town of Kittery
Son James granted 10 acres for his young orchard
Son Alexander to receive ½ of homestead and house after death of their mother
Son Daniel to receive the other ½
“My children William James Alexander Daniel Grizzell mary and Hannah to them Seven” each receives 1/7 of meadows and outlands.

8 children are named in various lists, not counting Elizabeth:
Elizabeth, b. 1664
Peter (Jr) [OKAHF 472] (Note: did he die before father’s will, therefore before 1709?)
William born about 1670
James born 23 Mar 1671
Alexander born 1674
Grizzel (married John Key Jr),
Mary (Pray) born about 1676
Daniel born about 1680
Hannah

Notes about Elizabeth Grant (1664-1731) [see GDMNH 281]
Born 1664
Was always repudiated by Peter Grant
James Grant [#2]’s 1679 will calls her the “daughter of Joane, the wife of Peter Grant”
Niven Agnew’s 1687 will calls Elizabeth Peter Grant’s daughter.
Peter Grant’s 1709 will does not claim her; only “them seven” children he had with Joan.
Married 1) James Landers, about 1685
James Landers born about 1653, leased Niven Agnew land 1688, died 23 June 1693
Married 2) John Turner, 28 Nov 1694 at Berwick, ME. 1 child, Mary
Married 3) William Hearl, 1709; His will 1718, probated 1730, names beloved wife Elizabeth [MW 311-313]
Died 1731
Sources:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, pp281, 282.
OKAHF Old Kittery and Her Families, Everett S. Stackpole, Lewiston, Maine: Press of the Lewiston Journal Company, 1903, pp133, 472.
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp79-80.
MW Maine Wills 1640-1760, William M. Sargent, Portland: Brown Thurston and Co., 1887, pp78-79, 104-105, 212-213, 311-313.
/petergrantthescot.com/peter-grant-generation-report/
New World Immigrants – Volume I, edited by Michael Tepper, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979
Province and Court Records of Maine, Vol II, Robert E. Moody, ed., Portland: Maine Historical Society, 1947
“Scottish Prisoners in Seventeenth-Century Maine and New Hampshire” by Diane Rapaport
Suff. Court Files 137175

B. Craig Stinson
August 5, 2016
______________________________________________________________

Torrey's New England Marriages to 1700 (19)
Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.

Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.
Torrey’s New England Marriages Prior to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.


Colonial Soldiers and Officers in New England, 1620-1775. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013).
Colonial Soldiers and Officers in New England, 1620-1775. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013).


Additional References:

  1. Leola Grant Bushman, Peter Grant, Scotch exile : Kittery and Berwick, Maine (1971). Unfortunately out of print, although I have a photocopy. I corresponded with Leola in the 1970s and 1980s. She, perhaps more than anyone else, pioneered the research on the Grant family and on Peter Grant in particular. ~Justin Swanstrom
  2. Here is the WorldCat entry for Leola’s book: https://www.worldcat.org/title/peter-grant-scotch-exile-kittery-and-berwick-maine/oclc/10026738
  3. Peter Grant Generation Report at Grant Genealogy | Descendants of Peter Grant The Scot Exile at WordPress
  4. Peter Grant by Justin Swanstrom at his Swan Knight WordPress Page
  5. Peter Grant at Geni.com, managed by Justin Swanstrom


  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ [] []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p.247. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Banks, C.E. 1927. ‘Scotch Prisoners deported to New England by Cromwell 1651-2’. Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 61, 4-30. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25080212 []
  5. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  6. Stinson, B. Craig. “‘Oyster River Scots.’” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 3 June 2018, scottishprisonersofwar.com/oyster-river-scots-by-b-craig-stinson/. []
  7. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  8. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Ch. 7, 8, Appendix B, p. 257-284. []
  9. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Old Kittery and Her Families. Lewiston, Me. : Press of Lewiston Journal Company, 1903, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/oldkitteryherfam00staciala/ []
  10. Gerrard, Chris; Graves, Pam; Millard, Andrew; Annis, Richard. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650 (Kindle Locations 4884-4889). Oxbow Books. Kindle Edition. []
  11. “The First Permanent Settlement in Maine, c. 1926 – Everett S. Stackpole.” Old Berwick Historical Society, May, 1968, www.oldberwick.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=375%3Athe-first-permanent-settlement-in-maine-c-1926-everett-s-stackpole&Itemid=126. []
  12. Legislators of Massachusetts General Court, 1691-1780 (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), (Orig. Pub. by Northeastern University Press , Boston, MA. John A. Schutz, Legislators of the Massachusetts General Court 1691–1780 A Biographical Dictionary, 1997. []