Denmark, Patrick

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Patrick Denmark“, #17 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list
Name Variations: Denmark/Denmor/Dunmarke, Patryarke
Resided: Dover, New Hampshire and Saco, Maine
Associations: Henery Brown and Thomas Doughty


First Generation in the New World

1. PATRICK¹ DENMARK, “Patrick the Scot“, was born in Scotland, about 1636 and died in Maine? after 1685. He married, at Saco, Maine, by 1663, HANNAH/ANNA (_____). 1

Biographical Notes:
1. Contributed by Dr. Andrew Millard in July 2018:
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 249, Patrick is categorized as: Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Denmark/Denmor, Patrick. Residences: Dover NH, Saco ME. Appears: 1662. B.c.1636. D.aft.1685. Closely associated with the Scots at Oyster River. [Exiles; DR; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8] For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.
2. Taxed in Dover, New Hampshire in 1662. 2
3. Moved to Saco, Maine after 1665 where more children were born. 2
4. Gave oath for land transaction in Maine on 21 Oct 1667, “Patrick Dumark” 3

Children of Patrick and Hannah (_____) Denmark: 2
2. PATRICK² DENMARK, born at Dover, NH on 08 Apr 1664.
2. JAMES² DEMNARK, born at Dover on 13 Mar 1665.
2. SON² DUNMARKE, born at Saco and Biddeford, Maine on 14 Oct 1667.4

Second and Third Generations

2. PATRICK² DENMARK, born at Dover, NH on 08 Apr 1664.

2. JAMES² DENMARK, was born at Dover [or Durham], NH on 13 Mar 1665 [or 13 May 1666]. He married at Wells, Maine on 01 April 1694, ELIZABETH [BARRETT] LITTLEFIELD, wife of Nathan. 2, 5

Biographical Notes:
A James Denmark has property in Kennebunk/Wells, Maine in 1699 nearby other Scots.6

2. SON² DUNMARKE, born at Saco and Biddeford, Maine on 14 Oct 1667.4

Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.)
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21135/125/426743720

Published: 21 August 2018
Updated: 11 Apr 2020
Researchers: Ray Dusek, Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust
Editor: Teresa Rust


For more information please contact the descendants/researchers of Patrick Denmark. Thank you! 🙂


Sources:
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire.

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Bridget Denmark inGenealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.
Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018.

Misc. Notes: (Until the below information can be verified, please use with caution.)
Submitted by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018:
Patrick Denmark, 1630–1698
Birth 1630 • ,,,Scotland
Death 1698 • Saco, York, Maine
Spouse: Hannah 1646-?
Children
Patrick Denmark 1664
James Denmark 1666-1698
John Denmark 1667-1669
Bridget Denmark 1669
Elizabeth Denmark 1671

James Denmark son of Patrick Denmark, 1666–?
Birth 13 MAY 1666 • Durham, Strafford, New Hampshire
Death ? • Boston Massachusetts
Spouse: Elizabeth Barrett 1664-1721
Children:
Lydia Denmark 1695
Elizabeth Barrett Denmark 1697
Mary Denmark 1698

Elizabeth Denmark daughter of Patrick Denmark 1671–
Birth 1671 • Eliot,York,Maine,British American Colony
Death Wells, York, Maine,
Spouse 1:
James Burnham 1687-1757
Children:
JAMES Burnham 1710-1787
Spouse 2:
Robert Sinclair 1680-1718 (see note at bottom of page )**
Children:
Elizabeth Sinclair 1713
John SINCLAIR 1714-1770
Spouse 3:
Peter Rich 1687-1755
Children:
Mary Rich 1718
Elizabeth was charged in court 1st was because of James Burnham 1710-1787 born out of wedlock
Maine Court Records, 1696-1854, Denmark, Elizabeth, Plaintiff/Defendant, York Court of Sessions
Date: January 1711
Cause: FORNICATION
Volume and Page 6-355-642-YORK
2nd was not going to church
Maine Court Records, 1696-1854
Denmark, Elizabeth, Plaintiff/Defendant, DEF, York Court of Sessions, date January 1697
NONATTENDANCE CHURCH
Volume and Page: 2-98-120-YORK
Robert Sinclair maybe related to one of the Scottish SPOW,I have not looked into it as of yet. Bridget Denmark daughter to Patrick Denmark if you see the attachment on her seem like she had her share of problems.

  1. DENMARK, Patrick & Hannah?/Anna ____; by 1663; Saco, ME/Dover, NH {Dover NH Mar. 48; Harmon Anc. 50; Sv. 2:38; GDMNH 193; Reg. 71:125}” New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21174/443/426883442 []
  2. Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. Contributed by Ray Dusek on 20 Oct 2018. [] [] [] []
  3. Maine: Early Wills and Deeds, 1640-1760. CD-ROM. Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB84/i/7514/86/22206947 []
  4. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21135/125/426743720 [] []
  5. New England Marriages to 1700. Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/i/21174/443/426883442 []
  6. https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/226/mode/2up/search/Stewart []

Canade, Thomas

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 20 Aug 2018, Updated: 28 Mar 2019
Page contributors: Rosann Beauvais, Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), 1

on page 249, Thomas is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Canade/Canyda/Kennedy, Thomas. Residences: Scarborough ME. Appears: 1657. D.1660. Killed by a falling tree. Inquest jury included three other Scots. [Exiles; DR] 2 3

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


1. THOMAS¹ CANADE/CANYDA, b. possibly in Scotland; d. 26 Dec. 1660.4

“Thomas Canyda…” was reportedly “…killed by the falling of a tree upon him near the house of Thomas Humphreys, in 1660.” The location was at the Oyster River area. 5

“We whose name are underwritten being called together & paneled a jury by Phillop Chesley, constable of Dover, to view & take notice of the sudden death of Thomas Canyda, do find & declare as followeth:
That the said Thomas Canyda according to our understandings was killed by a tree near to the house of Thomas Humfres, the tree being found upon him, & was forced to be cut before he could be got from under it, & this we judge was the cause of his death, witness our hands 26:10:60 [26 Dec. 1660]… John Bickford, John Davis, Mathias Gyles, willm willyams, John Meader, Thomas Stevenson, Charles Adams, Thomas willy, willyam Smith, pattericke Ginison, James middleton, Joe feild, Steven Joanes. Taken uppon oath ye day & yeare above mentioned before me Valentine Hill Comisioner.4 6


For additional help, please go to the Facebook Group.
(Our small website team is unable to help with further research.)


  1. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 249. []
  2. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  3. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  4. Hammond, Otis G., editor. New Hampshire Court Records 1640-1692 [New Hampshire Provincial and State Papers]. Vol. 40, The State of New Hampshire, 1943, pg. 468-469, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/newhampshireprov40none/page/n5. [] []
  5. Stackpole, Everett S., and Lucien Thompson. History of the Town of Durham New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation). Vol. One, Narrative, [Durham N.H.] : Published by Vote of the Town, 1913, pg. 46, 77, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historyoftownofd01stac/page/n8. []
  6. NHPP- Vol. 40, pp. 468-9 quoted in Focus on County Courts- Great Migration Newsletter- Vol. XVIII, p. 13. []

M’Shane, John

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

John M’Shane. #23 on George S. Stewart’s “Scots at Lynn 1653. Iron Works Inventory”1
Name Variations: Mackshane, Mackshame, Mackshawm, Mackshawin, Mackeshoune
Resided: Lynn, Scarborough and Saco, Massachusetts


First Generation in the New World

1. JOHN¹ M’SHANE, was born, presumably in Scotland. He died after 1676.

Biographical Notes:
1. Contributed by Dr. Andrew Millard in July 2018:
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018).
On page 247, John is categorized as: Definite [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Mackshane/Mackshame/Mackshawm/Mackshawin/Mackeshoune, John. Residences: Lynn, Scarborough, Saco MA. Appears: 1653. D.aft.1676. [Exiles; Banks; DR; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8] For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Published: 18 August 2018
Updated: 13 Apr 2020
Researchers: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust
Editor: Teresa Rust

  1. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ []

Chisholm, Duncan

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 18 August 2018, Updated: 28 May 2021
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, Rosann Beauvais, Ray Dusek, Sandra Chesemore


Duncan Chisholm #13 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” List1
Surname Variations: Chisholm, Jessum, Jesson, Chessom, Chesson, Chessmore, Chismore, Chissimore. Chiesmore


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (March 2021)
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018),2 on page 252, Duncan is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Chisholm/Jessum/Chessom/Chessmore, Duncan/Donken/Donkim. Residences: York and Scarborough ME. Appears: 1667. D. aft.1669. Clearly a Scot but appears quite late. [Exiles; DR; SPOWS]34156

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. DUNCAN¹ CHISHOLM/CHESSMORE/CHISMORE, was presumably born in Scotland abt 1630 Died possibly in Scarborough, Maine abt. 1676. Married at Black Point, Scarborough, Maine by 1671, unknown (_____).7

Biographical Notes:
We believe Duncan Chisholm was from Inverness area of Scotland a Highlander, we have no information on how or where he was from 1650 to 1657 which he shows up in Scarborough, Maine in 1657 fined in court for fighting with a fellow Scott John McKenney they both had been drinking and fighting.8 Duncan showed up again in Court 4 July 1667, referred to as “Duncan Jesson,” and charged with being drunk and fighting and fighting with “John Maccham.” They were fined and admonished.9 There was a latter problem brought to the courts attention and in this case “Dunken Jesson” was allowed court costs for prosecution against a “Mr. Richard Collicot” actions, which are not made clear in this report.10 His occupation is listed as a fisherman and also states where he was living at, on land that was called Chessmore Hill near Black point. Duncan (Jessum) Chisholm (Chessmore) wife is unknown, married in 1671 at Black point, Scarborough, Maine. There is a report in the Mckenney family that Duncan is fined for fighting with fellow scot John MacKane (McKenney), this may have something to do with John Mackane backing an officer leading the settlers during the conflict. There was some strong discord with at officer in which Duncan may have been right considering it led to a Massacre. This is the incident referred to in “A DOLEFUL SLAUGHTER NEAR BLACK POINT” of the Scarborough townsmen who could have participated in The Battle at Moore’s Brook, Scarborough, Maine, June 29, 1677. We know were Duncan was in Oct 1676 because of were he was assigned to a Garrison House. That is were the records stop. Is it possible that Duncan and his wife had more than one child? I would yes, we do know that one child did survive the attack but these are mysteries that we’ll never get answers too.  I’m sure that Duncan’s son Daniel was taken by the survivors or maybe a member of the Wife family down into Massachusetts after the inhabitants abandon the village. [Provided by Ray Dusek]

Children of DUNCAN¹ and unknown (_____) CHISHOLM:
2. i. DANIEL² CHISHOLM/CHESSMORE/CHESMON
 (Duncan¹), b. in Black Point, Scarborough 1671; died in Bradford, Essex, 1743; m. in Newbury, Essex by 1694, CYPRIAN SAMPSON,11 dau. of John and Sarah (Pease) Sampson, b. in Beverly 13 Mar 1672;12 d. 1745.

Children of DANIEL² and CYPRIAN (SAMPSON) CHISHOLM:
3. i. MARY³ CHISMORE/CHESEMORE
(Daniel², Duncan¹), b. 1691; d. 1750; m. in Newbury to John Cornish, (int. to m. 11 Aug 1716)13
3. ii. SARAH³ CHISEMORE (Daniel², Duncan¹), b. in Newbury 10 Sept 1694;14 d. 1792.
3. iii. ELIZABETH³ CHISMORE/CHESEMORE (Daniel², Duncan¹), b. in Newbury 30 Nov 1696;15 D. 1792.
3. iv. ABIGAIL³ CHISMORE/CHESMORE (Daniel², Duncan¹), b. in Newbury 15 May 1699;16 d. 1792; m. in Newbury to Daniel Rogers, (int. to m. 1 Dec 1721)13
3. v. JOSEPH³ CHISMORE/CHESMORE (Daniel², Duncan¹), b. 1701.
3. v. JACOB³ CHISMORE/CHESMORE (Daniel², Duncan¹), b. 1703; m. at Biddeford 26 Feb 1732, MARTHA SMITH.


TORREY’S NEW ENGLAND MARRIAGES LISTING THE MARRIAGE BETWEEN DUNCAN¹ CHISHOLM AND unknown (_____)7

Image showing the marriage of Duncan Chisholm
Duncan Chisholm marriage bef 1671 from Torrey’s New England marriages prior to 1700

CHISHOLM, CHESSEMORE REFERENCE FOR BOTH DUNCAN AND DANIEL FROM GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE17

Image showing the reference of Duncan Chisholm and Daniel Chesmore.
Reference to Duncan Chisholm/Chesmore and Daniel Chesmore/Chesemore

DUNCAN CHISHOLM, CHESSEMORE IN THE GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE17

Mention of Duncan Chisholm from page 141 of GDMNH
Duncan Chisholm reference from Noyes, Sibyl, et al. Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012, pg 141.

YORK COUNTY DEEDS, 1735, DANIEL CHESMORE SELLS “THE DWELLING OF DOWNCAN CHESMOARE FORMALLY OF SCARBOROUGH”18

York County Deed Book 17, page 351
Daniel Chiesmore sale of Downcan Chesmoare land in Scarborough, York County Deeds Book 17 p351

 

York County Deeds Book 17 page 352
Daniel Chiesmore sale of Downcan Chesmoare land in Scarborough, York County Deeds Book 17 p352

TORREY’S NEW ENGLAND MARRIAGES LISTING THE MARRIAGE BETWEEN DANIEL² CHISHOLM AND CYPRIAN SAMPSON 11

Marriage of Daniel Chisholm/Chesemore
Daniel Chesemore/Chisholm marriage before 1694 Torrey’s New England marriages prior to 1700

Sources and Information:

WikiTree collaboration for Daniel, son of Duncan Chisholm/Chesmore – https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Chezemone-1

FamilySearch collaboration for Duncan Chisholm/Chesmore – https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/L1XB-4GS


History which includes Black Point attacks – The Battle at Moore’s Brook, Scarborough, Maine, June 29, 1677 by Sumner Hunnewell


For additional help, please go to the:
Descendants and Researchers List and the Facebook Group.
(Our small website team is unable to help with further research.)


  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ [] []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 252. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  5. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  6. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Appendix B, p. 257-284. []
  7. New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21174/312/426880589 [] []
  8. Province and Court Records of Maine Vol. I-II. ed. Charles Thornton Libby. Portland, ME: Maine Historical Society, 1928-1931. []
  9. Province and Court Records of Maine Vol. II. ed. Charles Thornton Libby. Portland, ME: Maine Historical Soceity, 1928-1931, pg. 81, 85. []
  10. Province and Court Records of Maine Vol. I. ed. Charles Thornton Libby. Portland, ME: Maine Historical Society, 1928-1931, pg. 327. []
  11. New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21174/311/426880588 [] []
  12. Massachusetts: Vital Records, 1621-1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001-2016). https://www.americanancestors.org/DB190/rd/7658/289/141377140 []
  13. Massachusetts: Vital Records, 1621-1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001-2016). https://www.americanancestors.org/DB190/rd/7769/100/141719549 [] []
  14. Massachusetts: Vital Records, 1621-1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001-2016). https://www.americanancestors.org/DB190/i/7768/102/22282435 []
  15. Massachusetts: Vital Records, 1621-1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001-2016). https://www.americanancestors.org/DB190/rd/7768/101/141700263 []
  16. Massachusetts: Vital Records, 1621-1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001-2016). https://www.americanancestors.org/DB190/rd/7768/101/141700263 []
  17. Noyes, Sibyl, et al. Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012, pg 141. [] []
  18. York County (Me.). Register of Deeds. York Deeds, Book XVII, 1733-1735. Portland : Brown Thurston Company, 1892, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/stream/yorkdeeds17inmain. []

Bane, Lewis

Battle:3 Sep 1650, Battle of Dunbar, at Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity; Dec 1650, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Prisoner and List:Bane or Bean, Lewis, [Exiles; DR; Ch.8]
Name Variations:Bane, Bean
Residences:York, Maine
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published by Teresa: 16 August 2018


IMPORTANT UPDATE!
According to:
Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018).
On page 252, Lewis is categorized as:
Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Bane or Bean, Lewis. Residences: York ME. Appears: 1668. D.1677. Supposedly described by his son as “formerly of the Highlands”, but honorific Mr applied to him suggests higher status than the other Scots prisoners, so he may have been a later migrant. [Exiles; DR; Ch.8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost lives, New Voices.


Barry, James

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 16 August 2018
Updated: 10 Mar 2020
Researchers: Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust
Editor: Teresa Rust


Name Variations: Barry, Berry, Barrow


Contributed by Dr. Andrew Millard in July 2018:
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 248, James is categorized as: Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Barry, James. Residences: Kittery, ME. Appears: 1662. D.1676. Granted land at the same time as Scots who worked at the Great Works. [Banks; DR] For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ BARRY, was born presumably in Scotland and was killed by Native Americans in Kittery [now South Berwick], Maine on 16 Oct 1675. 1 He married

Biographical Notes:
“One of Agnew’s closest friends, Scotsman James Barry, died during an Indian 5 attack in 1675.”
He lived in Kittery, Maine.
James Barry, Mass. Historical Society Paper October 1927
Documents and/or publications that identify James BARRY as a Scottish prisoner of war from the Battle of Dunbar on 3 Sep 1650:

Massachusetts Historical Society paper written in October 1927 and available through The Essex Genealogist.

Scottish Prisoners and Their Relocation to the Colonies at Geni.com (I am not yet sure of the source for this information at Geni. It looks very similar to the MA Hist. Soc. paper c1927.) “In Kittery Maine, there is a Unity parish, doubtless from the prisoners, who were sent there to work in the sawmills. Approximately 15 Scots worked there. They were as follows: …James Barry

Nyven Agnew, also called Nivin Agneau, is called “Nivin the Scot” in the Dover tax-list of 1659, shortly after he got his freedom. He administered the estate of James Barry, another Scotchman of South Berwick, Me., about 1676, and lived on the land that Kittery had granted to Barry. Agnew’s will, 16 September 1687, mentions debts due him from James Barry, his predecessor. He divides his property between Peter Grant and John Taylor, two other Scotchmen. In the inventory of his estate is this item, “To a sword that Peter Grant did say he would give ten shillings for.” Neither Barry nor Agnew married. Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) (Published by vote of the Town, 1913), 1:76.

July 1, 1703, John Key senior, aged about 70 years, deposed that James Barry, Niven Agnue and John Taylor owned in succession a farm in upper Kittery, now South Berwick. Stackpole, History of the Town of Durham, 1:81.

Probably worked at sawmills in Kittery, Maine, “on the Asbenbedick, now Great Works, River in which Becx and Co. of London had an interest” under Richard Leader, former manager of ironworks. In the same year when Leader left, “grants of land were made to some of them [the Scots exiles] in 1656, indicating that they had been released.” Others in this group included Niven Agnew, Alexander Cooper, William Furbush, Daniel Ferguson, Peter Grant, George Gray, William Gowen, David Hamilton, Thomas Holme, John Key, Alexander Maxwell, John Neal, John Ross, John Taylor, William Thomson, and James Warren.” Charles Banks, “Scotch Prisoners Deported to New England by Cromwell, 1651-1652,” Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 61 (1927): 15.

BARROW, Barry, 1 James, Berwick. He had grants in Kit. 1662, 1673. Lists 25, 298. Wm. Gowen had James Barrow at his house and cured him of scurvy. K. by Ind in. 16 Oct. 1675. Adm. 4 Apr. 1676 to Niven Agnew, who mar. his wid. and liv. on his farm, next north of those shown in Stackp. Kittery, p. 133. No ch. Agnew’s will, calling him >my predecessor,= devised his lands. Sybil Noyes, et al., Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire (Portland, Me.: Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-39), p. 78.

At court in Wells, April 4, 1676: Lyberty granted to Nivine Nignow to Improve James Barrows Land untill the Court take further order, hee allowing for the uss of It such a Consideration as is meete.

At court in Wells, July 4, 1676: Pouer of Administration granted unto Nivine Nignow of the Estate of James Barrow deceased, who is Injoyned to bring in a true Inventory thereof & to bring in security sufficient to respond that estate unto the next Court of Assotiates houlden for this County on the 2und Tusday of September next Insewing. Ibid., 2:315.

See: Diane Rapaport, “Scots for Sale, Part II: Scottish Prisoners in Seventeenth-Century Maine and New Hampshire,” New England Ancestors (Holiday 2004), 27, which discussed James Barry and his close friend, Niven Agnew: One of Agnew’s closest friends, Scotsman James Barry, died during an Indian 5 attack in 1675. Agnew administered the estate, not only taking possession of Barry’s farm below the Great Works, but also marrying his friend’s widow. When Agnew died childless, about 1687, his will granted all of his property to two daughters of Scottish neighbors John Taylor and Peter Grant.

  1. Diane Rapaport, “Scots for Sale, Part II: Scottish Prisoners in Seventeenth-Century Maine and New Hampshire,” New England Ancestors (Holiday 2004), 27 []

McNair, Alexander

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 23 Aug 2016, Updated: 01 Sep 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


Alexander M’Nair, #77 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 250, Alexander is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

McNair/Mackanere/MacNair/Mackaneer/Macaneere/Machanare/Mackinire/Mackinime, Alexander. Residences: Scotland York ME. Appears: 1666. D.1670. He first appears quite late but has extensive interactions with other Scots in York. His widow married Micum McIntire [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


Descendants & Researchers

Scottish Surname:

The surnames of Scotland, their origin meaning and history ... Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948.
The surnames of Scotland, their origin meaning and history … Black, George Fraser, 1866-1948.

First Generation in the New World

1. ALEXANDER¹ MCNAIR, was born presumably in Scotland and died in New Hampshire about 1670. He married, DOROTHY PEARCE, daughter of fisherman, John Pearce of York. He had no children.

Biographical Notes:
Alexander was probably not one of Valentine Hill’s Scots, but he was one of the Dunbar prisoners. He married Dorothy, the younger daughter of fisherman John Pearce of York. When we see him as a free man, probably in his mid-30’s, he is suffering from lameness and weakness; he died about 1670, leaving no children. His widow Dorothy married fellow Scot Micum McIntire.

John Pearce’s younger daughter Dorothy Pearce first married Scot Alexander Mackaneer (unknown date).
[Note: Stinson suspects he is the “Alexander M’Nair” who is #77 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list.] [see also GDMNH 451]
In 1666 he and his wife were excused for their 5-week absence from church due to his lameness and weakness.
Mackaneer died about 1670; he had no children [GDMNH 451]
Before 4 Sep 1671 Dorothy Pearce Mackaneer married Micum McIntire (#61 on the Dunbar Prisoners list) [GDMNH 451, 553, 472]

SOURCES AND NOTES:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, pp. 129, 451, 472, 553.
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, p. 77.
History of York, Maine, vol. 1, Charles Edward Banks, Boston: Society for the Preservation of Historical Landmarks in York County, 1931-1935, pp. 267-270, 282
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=thurtle-walker&id=I317
B. Craig Stinson
July 23, 2016

Middleton, James

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 23 Aug 2016
Updated: 04 Mar 2020
Researchers: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson
Editor: Teresa Rust


James Middleton, #55 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list

Name variations: Middleton, Medellton


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 251, James is categorized as:

Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Middleton, James. Residences: Oyster River, Great Island NH, Kennebec ME. Appears: 1658. D.aft.1683. Probably one of Valentine Hill’s seven Scots. [Exiles; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES PATTERSON, was born presumably in Scotland and died after 1676.

Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.)
https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/21071/257/1427098887

Descendants and Researchers

________________________________________________________
Scots at Oyster River
James Middleton by B. Craig Stinson
15 August 2016

James Middleton was a single man who probably worked originally for Valentine Hill. In his early life he was in court for frequenting taverns and also for quarreling and fighting. The fight that got him into court was with two Englishmen and with Scot William Gowen. Middleton may have worked in the home of the local medical doctor, David Ludecas Edling. When Dr. Ludecas died in 1660 followed by Mrs. Edling in 1664, James Middleton was assigned to administer their estate. Later he sold land to the same William Gowen he had fought with in earlier years.

#55 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

14 Feb 1658 – admitted as inhabitant of Dover [GDMNH 478]
3 June 1659 – convicted of frequenting taverns and for quarrelling and fighting.
Fined £20, Valentine Hill was surety on his bond for good behavior. That same time, Philip Chesley, Thomas Footman, and William Smith (Gowan) were convicted of quarrelling with Middleton and were fined; George Vezie was convicted of being more than half an hour in the tavern.

Middleton, James 2

New Hampshire Court Records, 1659
26 October 1660 – on jury of inquest in the death of Thomas Canyda who was killed when a tree fell on him.
May have worked in home of Dr. David Ludecas Edling at Dover
1660 – administered estate of Ludecas Edling
1664 – administered estate of Mrs. Edling [HTDNH 82-83] [GDMNH 447]
16 Sep 1676 – was a resident of Great Island
1676 – sold land at Small Point on the Kennebec to William Gowen. [GDMNH 280 and HTDNH 83]
No known family [GDMNH 478]

Sources:
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp. 82-83.

GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, pp. 280, 447, 478.

New Hampshire Court Records 1640-1692, vol. 40, Ed. Otis G. Hammond, The State of New Hampshire, 1943, pp. 139, 199, 469

B. Craig Stinson
August 15, 2016
______________________________________________________________

Grant, James (3) “the Drummer”

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 22 June 2016, Updated: 14 Sep 2018
Page contributors: Dr. Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust


IMPORTANT UPDATE! (July 2018)
According to, Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, in, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018), on page 253, James (3) ‘the Drummer’ is categorized as:

Possible [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity]

Grant/Graunt, James (3) ‘the Drummer’. Residences: Dover NH, York ME. Appears: 1657. D.1693. Also recorded as ‘welsh James Grant’ [Exiles; DR; BCS; Ch.7 & 8]

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.


First Generation in the New World

1. JAMES¹ GRANT (3), “the Drummer”, “welsh James Grant”, “of York,” died in 1693. He married, HANNAH (_____).

Children of James and Hannah (_____) Grant:
2. JAMES GRANT, m., PATIENCE AUSTIN, daughter of, MATTHEW AUSTIN.

Second Generation

2. JAMES GRANT, m., PATIENCE AUSTIN, daughter of, MATTHEW AUSTIN.

Children of James and Patience (Austin) Grant: FIVE SONS
3. JOSHUA GRANT, b. 9 Oct 1712, m., MERCY (_____). SIX CHILDREN

Stackpole, Everett S.. The History and Genealogy of the Stackpole Family, (Lewiston, Maine: Journal Printshop and Bindery, 1920): Page 151:

https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy00stac#page/150/mode/2up/search/Grant
James may have been a Dunbar POW instead of a Worcester POW according to Lost Lives, New Voices https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy00stac#page/150/mode/2up/search/Grant

Brown, Henry

Battle:Battle of Dunbar in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Ship/Arrival:Unity, Dec 1650
Prisoner and List:
Name Variations:
Residences:
Other SPOW Associations:
Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published: 24 May 2016
Updated: 13 Apr 2020
Researchers: Rosann Beauvais, Andrew Millard, Teresa Rust, B. Craig Stinson
Editors: Teresa Rust and Rosann Beauvais


Henry Brown, #9 on George S. Stewart’s Captured at Dunbar list1

First Generation in the New World

1. HENRY¹ BROWN, was born presumably in Scotland; d. ca. 1692 perhaps in Wells, Maine. Unmarried.

Biographical Notes:
1. Contributed by Dr. Andrew Millard in July 2018:
According to Christopher Gerrard, Pam Graves, Andrew Millard, Richard Annis, and Anwen Caffell, Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650, (England: Oxbow Books, 2018),2 on page 248, Henry is categorized as: Probable [that he is a Dunbar prisoner transported on the Unity] Brown/?Brounell, Henry. Residences: Oyster River NH, Wells ME. Appears: 1658. D.1677×1692. Unmarried. Lived with James Orr. One of Valentine Hill’s Seven Scots. It is just possible that he is the Henry Brounell on the John and Sara. [Exiles; DR; BCS; SPOWS; Ch.7 & 8]3 4 5 1 6 7

For explanations of the category, abbreviations and references see List of Dunbar prisoners from Lost Lives, New Voices.
2. In 2016, Carol Gardner said:
“I’m a researcher for Thomas Doughty. I know that there was a Henry Brown in Maine who lived much of his life with James Orr. They were both Dunbar prisoners and both started as slaves of Valentine Hill at Oyster River. Later, they moved to Wells, Maine where they operated a mill with another Scot, Robert Stewart. Thomas Doughty had a couple of lumber contracts with them, and may have resided with, or near them, during King Philip’s War.”


Scots at Oyster River
Henry Brown (d. bef. 1692)
James Orr (d. aft. 1692)
by
Craig Stinson
July 31, 2016

Henry Brown and James Orr Henry Brown and James Orr appear to have been among the “Seven Scots” who belonged originally to Valentine Hill and worked his sawmill at Oyster River. They eventually located in Wells, Maine, where for several years they owned and operated a sawmill and blacksmith enterprise. Neither ever married; they lived together their entire lives, often at the very edge of civilization, legally binding themselves to one another so that if one died the other was to inherit all their common property. Henry Brown seems to have died before 1692. Because neither married or had children, their stories are seldom retold by later generations.5

Also see: James Orr aka Ore, Oar, Carr, #82 on “The Dunbar Prisoners” list

The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire often listed Henry Brown, James Orr, and “Urine” [Edward Erwin/Irwin – possible Worcester survivor] together. Brown and Orr stated that they learned the sawmill trade from Valentine Hill. They were presumably part of Mr. Valentine Hill’s 7 Scots whose indentures he had acquired.8 9 7

Timeline:

10 Nov 1658 – Brown and Orr were admitted as inhabitants Oyster River and taxed in 1659. They lived together as unmarried men. 10

1662 – Brown, Orr, and “Errin” [Edward Erwin/Irwin – possible Worcester survivor] bought “a farm at Bradboate Harbour in Pischataq River at the Wadeing place, with 50 acres of upland” for 100 pounds (between Kittery and York, long called “Scotchman’s Neck.”) They also had a grant in 1662 for “eight score acres near “Moharmitts marsh.” 10 7

Abt. 1663- “Layd out and Bounded to Henrey Brown and James Ore fower ackers [four acres] which were given and granted unto Mr. Valentine Hills seven Scotes in the yeir 1652… It bordered on the “freshet” that is, the mill-pond above the dam at Durham Falls, and was on the south side of the river, and on the Newmarket road.” 11

1667-1668 – Brown and Orr may have operated mills at both upper Kittery and Saco falls with Thomas Doughty 10

1667-1669 – Brown and Orr sold out at Oyster River on 8 Aug 1667 to Teige Riall of Oyster River for 30 pounds for four and one half acres with a house and fences. Tiege Riall then sold it to James Smith, a tailor, on 28 Mar 1670.9 10 12

1675 – Brown and Orr left Doughty, who was now married at Saco, and moved to Wells where at first they got out logs for the Sayward mill, later for their own at Mousam, now Kennebunk village, where it was known as The Scotchmen’s mill. They became residents in the township of Wells, 3 June 1675, buying 200 acres at “Mowsome” from Henry Sayward. “Brown and Orr lived many years in Wells, Me.” 9 10

1679 – The History of Wells and Kennebunk suggests that Henry Sayward entrusted the care of his mills to “Henry Brown and James Carr [Orr?], Scotsmen. These men in 1679, had taken a grant of the land on both sides of the river, bounding on the mill lot. The brook, always termed “the Scotchman’s Brook,” passed through this land.” The book goes on to state that the men, Henry Brown and James Carr [Orr?], “…came over to this country to engage in business of this kind, bringing with them several mechanics as auxiliaries to their work.” The book claims that Brown and Carr [Orr?] established a very successful “blacksmith’s shop on the western side of the river.” The book continues on with speculations on who the men who worked the lumber mills might have not desired a life with women. It seems very speculative and meant to grab one’s imagination. 13

1684- Henry Brown and James Oare [Orr] received a grant on the west side of Mousam river at the “head of tide water”, of four and a half acres. 14

1686- “Brown and Orr brought suit against John Bray for carrying away their grass at brave Boat Harbor.” 11

8 Dec 1692 – James Orr of Wells, logger and sawyer, sold the grant that belonged to him and Henry Brown 9 , so presumably Henry Brown had died.

— By B. Craig Stinson


Sources and Notes:
References:
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and
Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, p. 114.
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp. 77.
The History of Wells and Kennebunk, E. E. Bourne, Portland, Me: B. Thurston & Co., 1875, pp. 116-118. E. Bourne offers his imagining as to how their lives together may have been.


For additional help, please go to the Facebook Group.

  1. Stewart, George Sawin. The Bartlett Collection. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. /george-sawin-stewart-documents/ [] []
  2. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 248. []
  3. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. []
  4. Rapaport, Diane. Working List of Early New England Scots. 2015. []
  5. Stinson, B. Craig. “‘Oyster River Scots.’” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 3 June 2018, scottishprisonersofwar.com/oyster-river-scots-by-b-craig-stinson/. [] []
  6. “Dunbar Prisoners of War Profiles.” The Scottish Prisoners of War Society, Teresa Rust, 18 Feb. 2019, scottishprisonersofwar.com/battle_of_dunbar_pows_america/. []
  7. Gerrard, Christopher M.., et al. Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650. Oxbow Books, 2018. Ch. 7, 8. [] [] []
  8. Stackpole, Everett S., and Lucien Thompson. History of the Town of Durham New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation). Vol. One, Narrative, [Durham N.H.] : Published by Vote of the Town, 1913, pg. 60, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historyoftownofd01stac/page/n8. []
  9. Noyes, Sibyl, et al. Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012, pg. 114 [] [] [] []
  10. Stackpole, Everett S., and Lucien Thompson. History of the Town of Durham New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation). Vol. One, Narrative, [Durham N.H.] : Published by Vote of the Town, 1913, pg. 77, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historyoftownofd01stac/page/n8. [] [] [] [] []
  11. Stackpole, Everett Schermerhorn. Scotch Exiles in New England. 1922. Coll. 733 & 831, Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Portland ME. [] []
  12. Scales, John. Historical Memoranda Concerning Persons & Places in Old Dover, N.H. Vol. 1, Dover, N.H., 1919, Internet Archives, archive.org/details/historicalmemora00scal/page/n5. []
  13. Bourne, Edward E. The History of Wells and Kennebunk, B. Thurston & Co. Portland, 1875. pg 116-117, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/116 []
  14. Bourne, Edward E. The History of Wells and Kennebunk, B. Thurston & Co. Portland, 1875. pg 187, Internet Archives, https://archive.org/details/historyofwellske00bourrich/page/116 []